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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I just purchased a 2018 Subaru forester 2.5i-l and have only just realized how difficult it is to get any kind of GPS on screen. I have a Samsung s9 and cannot get the Mirror link to work or suitable app for GPS. I have downloaded Maze and car Mode but I am a bit daft with technology. Please help.
 

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2018 Forester 6MT
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44 Posts
I seem to recall that either the Subaru head units only support an older version of MirrorLink (1.2 vs 2.0?), or modern phone vendors have abandoned it for Android Auto, or both. I believe people had luck getting it to work with older phones, like a Galaxy S3 or similar (yes, even on something like a 2018). There should be some threads on it.

My approach is a phone mount for now, and to just save up for an aftermarket deck that supports Android Auto.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you. I have tried researching and this seems to be my conclusion also..I was just hoping for a secret. Thank you though. I didn't have gps sat nav before so not a problem!
Thanks
 

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2010 Forester Diesel 6MT
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741 Posts
HI Cas88,


Main solution is I'd look for some aftermarket system with Android Auto and/or a good GPS built in. Make sure your device can connect to it BEFORE it is installed in your car.

I have heard these Starlink/Mirrorlink systems can be an issue. I haven't had experience myself, but a couple of things I have heard are:

- See this link and search for the post from "Serhii 16th September 2019" - it's for an older, different model car (2016 Outback) but may help

- Contact your local Subaru dealer, update may be available and/or required.

- Contact your local Subaru dealer and see if they will help set it up for you. If you bought it from a dealer, they SHOULD set it up for you. An update may be available and/or required.

- You need to make sure the device "trusts" your car (make it a "trusted device" when it tries to connect. You may be able to use either Bluetooth or the USB connector.

- The apps also need to be compatible and not many are. HOWEVER apparently you should be able to 'mirror' your phone to the screen, i.e. make it display what is on the phone's display.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you Patrick contacting a subaru dealer near me will be an option in the future. I have survived all this time without. I was just stupid to assume that the 2018 technology would include a decent gps.
Thanks for the link and suggestions!
 

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2010 Forester Diesel 6MT
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I have survived all this time without.
So have I :)
And be warned: having GPS is like an instant frontal lobotomy for your in-built, hard-learnt-over-a-lifetime navigation instincts. No longer do you say, "turn X in x km, turn Y in y km after landmark Z". You go, "Huh??? Mr GPS???? What do I do now? Left in 2km? Please warn me when I'm getting close..."

I was just stupid to assume that the 2018 technology would include a decent gps.
One suggestion: Get an android tablet with GPS-it doesn't have to be a expensive one- Or use your (larger) phone and download a free program called "Here Maps" (the old "Nokia Maps"). Takes a few Gb of download but it stores the whole map of Australia on the device which means you don't need to rely on phone signal. As long as the device has GPS signal you can navigate. And you can take the device with you. It will do all the 'other' navigations too (public transport, bike, walking, etc). You'll need a 12V charger/adaptor for the device to power it in the car and some way of mounting it. If you use an old device you can dedicate it to this. I end up with it simply on the seat next to me, talking at me.

Note that compared to an in-car GPS, this will not be able to tell what you are doing during GPS loss of signal, e.g. in a tunnel. In-built car GPSes seem to either use inertial signals (e.g. from the car's sensors) or estimates from the car's computer speed to estimate where you are.

Another program to get is "GPSTest". This will allow you to see the GPS signal (so you can get a good location in the car) as it will report the GPS speed you can calibrate your speedo . Ever noticed how in-car GPSes never report speed? That's because they would contradict the speedo which is allowed to read 0km/h low and up to 10%+4km/h high. Imagine the complaints! Yet the car (assuming you have the right wheel/tyre combo fitted and haven't tampered with anything) knows your speed within approx 1%- otherwise the odo couldn't be accurate- and it's required to be within +/-2%.

Case in point: my Forester diesel 2010.
GPS speed: 100km/h
OBD reported speed: 101km/h (so Odo will be accurate...YAAAY! :) )
Speedo shown speed: 109.km/h
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So have I :)
And be warned: having GPS is like an instant frontal lobotomy for your in-built, hard-learnt-over-a-lifetime navigation instincts. No longer do you say, "turn X in x km, turn Y in y km after landmark Z". You go, "Huh??? Mr GPS???? What do I do now? Left in 2km? Please warn me when I'm getting close..."


One suggestion: Get an android tablet with GPS-it doesn't have to be a expensive one- Or use your (larger) phone and download a free program called "Here Maps" (the old "Nokia Maps"). Takes a few Gb of download but it stores the whole map of Australia on the device which means you don't need to rely on phone signal. As long as the device has GPS signal you can navigate. And you can take the device with you. It will do all the 'other' navigations too (public transport, bike, walking, etc). You'll need a 12V charger/adaptor for the device to power it in the car and some way of mounting it. If you use an old device you can dedicate it to this. I end up with it simply on the seat next to me, talking at me.

Note that compared to an in-car GPS, this will not be able to tell what you are doing during GPS loss of signal, e.g. in a tunnel. In-built car GPSes seem to either use inertial signals (e.g. from the car's sensors) or estimates from the car's computer speed to estimate where you are.

Another program to get is "GPSTest". This will allow you to see the GPS signal (so you can get a good location in the car) as it will report the GPS speed you can calibrate your speedo . Ever noticed how in-car GPSes never report speed? That's because they would contradict the speedo which is allowed to read 0km/h low and up to 10%+4km/h high. Imagine the complaints! Yet the car (assuming you have the right wheel/tyre combo fitted and haven't tampered with anything) knows your speed within approx 1%- otherwise the odo couldn't be accurate- and it's required to be within +/-2%.

Case in point: my Forester diesel 2010.
GPS speed: 100km/h
OBD reported speed: 101km/h (so Odo will be accurate...YAAAY! :) )
Speedo shown speed: 109.km/h



Thanks Patrick for informative and entertaining response. Your suggestions are helpful although I think I will just continue life without and use my own instincts and brain power as previous!
 
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