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2017 Forester 2.5i CVT
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My 2017 Subaru Forester 2.5i keeps dying. Called road-side assistance 6 times for a jump start. Went to Subaru dealership twice and every time they said nothing wrong with the battery. Driving Subaru 2-3 times a week as I have other cars. One time I went grocery shopping, went back to parking and it's dead. Heard people saying that some Subaru dealership put lower battery size on new vehicles.

What is Canada's 2017 Subaru Forester 2.5i OEM battery size specs?
Mine is 526RMF, 26R-540 CCA, 665CA. Is this also same for those who has Canada's 2017 Subaru Forester 2.5i?

Thanks.
 

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2014 Touring with Eyesigh CVT
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610 Posts
Simple solution, just purchase a deep cell battery and make your life easier.

Laughing at oneself and with others is good for the Soul
 

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1999 "L" - 231,000 mi. AT
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715 Posts
Welcome to the forum - your first post.

What is Canada's 2017 Subaru Forester 2.5i OEM battery size specs?
Mine is 526RMF, 26R-540 CCA, 665CA.
My old '99 with 2.5 engine is running a group 24F battery with 740CCA label on it.
 

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2006 Forester X 4spd auto (4EAT)
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60 Posts
If you measure the voltage across the battery posts while the car is running, you should see about 14V. Even if the battery was run down before starting, the voltage should start rising toward 14V when the engine is running, not decreasing. This means the charging system is working. If it's decreasing, it needs fixing. Could be the alternator or bad connections.
 

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鈥14 FXTT; '15 Legacy FB25
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None of us here have enough information to help you, OP.

Might I suggest you buy a $10 multimeter from you favorite store (e.g., HF, Walmart, HD, Lowe's) and check the voltage with the car off and while running. If you don't feel comfortable doing your own measurements, then places like Advance Autoparts and Autozone may offer free diagnostics, including an in-car alternator check.

Note: every time your battery is run down to dead it should be charged to full. Driving around, especially short distances, will not charge your battery sufficiently, resulting in a higher risk of follow-on dead batteries. Also, the more time your battery spends at less than 100%, the more it will degrade. A battery that is habitually maintained low will degrade all of that much more quickly.

Without enough information to make a good decision, I would still bet that your battery needs to be replaced; based solely on the number of times it has been drained to dead. Check your running voltage before you press for a new battery, though.

//

Do you sit in your car with engine off and things turned on for extended periods of time? Do you leave your keys in the car; in the ignition?

Is your commute very short?
 

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'19 Forester LTD CVT
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If you measure the voltage across the battery posts while the car is running, you should see about 14V. Even if the battery was run down before starting, the voltage should start rising toward 14V when the engine is running, not decreasing. This means the charging system is working. If it's decreasing, it needs fixing. Could be the alternator or bad connections.
To add to this (and repeat a few things)

Voltage of battery while running: 13-14 volts
Voltage of battery when car is off: 12+ volts
Voltage of the battery while cranking should not really drop below 10.

The best way to test a battery is to bring it to Napa/O'Reilly/Advance/etc and have them test it. They can do actual load testing of cranking amperage and such.

I'd also say that a good 20% of people thinking they have bad batteries is actually a loose cable. Goes away with a new battery but just because they retightened the terminal. Check that first.
 
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2017 Forester 2.5i CVT
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180 Posts
Have you checked your cables and cleaned them? When my 2017 started very weakly here in New York on a cold January day I checked and found heavy black oxidation at both battery terminal and cable connections. I cleaned them and greased with a thin white lithium grease coating, and my car has started vigorously ever since, and I have the crappy 390 CCA battery they give you on the USA models.
 

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2018 Forester Auto
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20 Posts
My 14 Forester did similar things. Eventually even had it towed to dealership, they checked battery said it wouldn鈥檛 hold charge and replaced with unbelievably a Subaru battery. The original battery wasn鈥檛 even a Subaru battery. Try to have them replace.
 

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Same issue

Same exact issue. Finally got a new battery after 3 service calls, none of whom could diagnose.
We now carry a small jump starter for reassurance.
Love the car, puzzled by dealer inability to figure it out!
 

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2014 Forester 2.5i Ltd. CVT
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19 Posts
I have experienced this same thing on our 2014 Forester. Last summer I had to jump start the car that was just sitting while my wife was at an appointment. After an overnight charge, the battery tested ok for voltage and cold cranking amps, but I put in a new battery anyway that had better CCA. We passed the Forester on to my daughter when we got our new Ascent and recently we hear that they had to call AAA to start the car. The battery tested fine, but the tester revealed a ripple in the charging current. Bad rectifier or some other glitch? At first I thought there was some sort of random draw on the battery like leaving the light on in the car by accident. I did kill the battery once at home that way. Now I am thinking there is an electrical system problem. We have extended coverage for the car, but now I hear that someone (not me) didn鈥檛 mail it in. Dope slap required. I鈥檒l be sure to post information if Subaru finds something.
 

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2011 Forester auto 4
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9 Posts
Either the charging system isn't working correctly, or there is a voltage drain somewhere when the car is parked. It can be difficult to find the culprit, but a shop should be able to detect the drain and isolate it to a particular component. Ford had a problem like that with the C-Max hybrid, where early models would drain the starting battery (not the traction battery) overnight, leaving the car inoperative. There was a bad computer board that was responsible. It's also worth considering whether the battery may actually be bad, whatever the dealer said. We had a Honda CR-V whose battery died in the first 6 months of ownership. My suspicion was that that particular car had been slow to sell, had sat on the dealer's lot too long without being driven, and had sulfated the battery. They should be able to determine this with a load test. Whatever the problem is, you need a different dealer or repair shop, it's not acceptable to send a customer back onto the street with a car that can't be parked for 3 days without losing charge. My vehicles sometimes sit for a month, no problem.
 

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2017 Forester 2.5fi CVT
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2017 Subaru charging system TSB software upgrade

Sorry if someone already responded to this. I bought a 2017 Forester used and after sitting for a few days the battery was dead. First dealer replaced battery and said they did a software upgrade. A few days later the new battery (a 550 ah upgrade from the stock) was dead. I took it to another dealer and they said the first dealer didn't do the upgrade. Apparently there is a TSB on this; a bug in the software keeps the alternator from charging when it should. After the second dealer upgraded the (ECU?) software I've had no problems.
 

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2019 3.6R & 98 Forester Atlanta, GA
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1999 forester automatic
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So your bat is 2 yrs old in CAnada? Sure is a demanding climate for Batteries. Things to consider,
The dealer can't find anything wrong so they let you walk away thinking it's all in your head, Right? They all have a way of doing this in the US as well.
The bat depends on a charge constant and must be able to meet the demands put on it. The winter demands much with the heater & wipers always on.
To get a constant charge things like the Drive Belt must be tight and not worn for starters. Once this is done the alternator will be doing it's job of charging the battery. This is the basics. You could verify with a meter, costs about $10, nothing fancy. Verify that the battery is at the proper voltage around 13-14 volts. You may want to do this in the morning before you start the car up. This will tell you how the overnight cold affects the battery. ( remember CCA really means Cold Cranking Amps) We can assume you don't have a drain like lights left on, ie Dome lights.
You will want to be sure the terminals are clean and tight on the battery of course. (a terminal cleaner brush cost about $3), I'm Going to assume the cables are in good condition and this means at both ends. ( simply because your car is only 2 yrs old and I can't see it from here)
If you have a battery charger it can do a slow charge and bring up the battery to where it should be. Takes about 1/2 hr.- 45mins. I would not rule out the battery in the end since even a 2 yr old battery could have a bad cell condition.
The last time I bought a battery for my car it cost about $90 at Walmart and last over 6yrs. ( In Colorado)
I hope this gives you some ideas and gets you to where you won't need to worry about dead batteries again.
Cars are always great things until they're Not!
 

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鈥14 FXTT; '15 Legacy FB25
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The OEM battery in our '14 FXT is still going strong (enough).

I am curious to know whether a new battery would quicken the starting sequence, but not enough to trash the current battery.

Note: I use a DC power supply to TRULY fully charge the battery at least every few weeks.
 

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2005 Forester EJ251
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There is another test with the multimeter. With engine off remove the B+ terminal and check if there is some current draw with everything off and the doors closed. A faulty diode in the alternator can give a slow drain.

The second thing is a broken plate in the battery or sulphated plates which can short out the charge. Down here in Oz I used to average seven years battery life with our home manufactured products but the company decided to go off-shore and I am on my third battery in two-years replaced under warranty (I might add, no questions asked so I guess the manufacturer is well aware of their new product)
 

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2017 Forester 2.5i
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My 2017 Subaru Forester 2.5i keeps dying. Called road-side assistance 6 times for a jump start. Went to Subaru dealership twice and every time they said nothing wrong with the battery. Driving Subaru 2-3 times a week as I have other cars. One time I went grocery shopping, went back to parking and it's dead. Heard people saying that some Subaru dealership put lower battery size on new vehicles.
It's been mentioned already but you should check your battery voltage with engine off. I also have a 2017 Forester (US). My factory battery had very little reserve capacity; i.e. 15 minutes of radio in ACC mode and it might not start. Charging system is healthy but static voltage is only 12.0. A healthy battery should read 12.6 or higher. Replacing the battery solved my issue.
 
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