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2016 Forester AT
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title states, I'm currently looking to replace my rear wheel hub assembly. Sadly, i need to change it just 50k kms on my car (31k Miles)
So what's available here in my country as far as my research goes are NTN brand or the OE (NTN = $50~ vs. OE = $120) Carico is also available but I dont think its a good brand.
I'm just concerned with quality, compatibility (especially with the sensor) or are there any thing that i should be looking for or be concered for?

Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated

Forester SJ NA
 

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2007 2.5XT Limited 4EAT
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343 Posts
Plus one on the NTN...I'd wager that if the OE only lasted 50K there is no need to spend the extra coin.
 

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2015 Forester 2.5i Limited CVT
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1,141 Posts
I would go with the updated OEM WBs.
IDK if NTN makes them but Subaru has updated the rear WB design to be sturdier according to the TSB.

I really don’t know why some WBs go out so quickly and others do not. My GFs 2003 has original WBs with 145k miles. My 2015 has 81k miles. No issues.
 

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2016 Forester AT
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would go with the updated OEM WBs.
IDK if NTN makes them but Subaru has updated the rear WB design to be sturdier according to the TSB.

I really don’t know why some WBs go out so quickly and others do not. My GFs 2003 has original WBs with 145k miles. My 2015 has 81k miles. No issues.
Yup. Thats my problem now. Just under 31k miles and i had to change a lot on my suspension. Even change everything in the front except wheel bearings...
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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1,219 Posts
Any thoughts on JPS bearings(japan parts services) JPS-Japan Parts Servce Inc.- » Our Products
No idea, never heard of them. Their website has lots of spelling errors in English. Bearings fail from impacts and you are really only ever one good pothole away from eventually needing a new one.
''
The main reasons that a wheel bearing fails are:

  • Faulty installation – inappropriate tools such as a hammer or an impact wrench can cause damage to the exterior and or interior of the wheel end bearing causing the wheel bearing to fail prematurely. Also, re-using the old accessories such as bolts, nuts, circlips, split pins, seals,… instead of replacing them with new ones can cause the wheel end bearing to operate under abnormal or unsafe conditions, increasing wheel end bearing wear and risk of a car accident.
  • Impact damage or poor road quality – all impacts from driving through a pothole, driving over speed bumps or hitting the curbstone can damage a wheel bearing and reduce its lifespan.
  • Poor quality wheel bearing – a wheel bearing is continuously under enormous pressure. Wheel bearings constructed of low-quality materials can have poor heat-treatment, resulting in premature wear and failure.
  • Driving conditions – driving through deep water or mud can cause your wheel bearings to fail. Water, mud or other contaminants such as dust or road salt could get past the seals and enter the bearing, polluting the grease and wearing away the bearings.
  • Car modifications – fitting bigger or wider rims, tires with lower thread walls, stiffer shock absorbers and suspension springs cause higher loads on the wheel bearing and can accelerate wear. Stick to rims, tires, shock absorbers and springs that are specified by the car manufacturer to minimize the impact on the longevity of the wheel bearings.
source How long do wheel bearings last?.
 

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2015 Forester 2.5i Limited CVT
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I agree that improper installation can cause problems. The knuckle, if the ID is out of round from forcefully and harshly removing the WB.

Having the right tools to press out a WB carefully is IMHO, very important. If you look at some of the Subaru special tools, they are basically press out tools. Going Neanderthal on a WB install will not help. See: Hub Shocker. Awful tool.
 

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2016 Forester AT
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No idea, never heard of them. Their website has lots of spelling errors in English. Bearings fail from impacts and you are really only ever one good pothole away from eventually needing a new one.
''
The main reasons that a wheel bearing fails are:

  • Faulty installation – inappropriate tools such as a hammer or an impact wrench can cause damage to the exterior and or interior of the wheel end bearing causing the wheel bearing to fail prematurely. Also, re-using the old accessories such as bolts, nuts, circlips, split pins, seals,… instead of replacing them with new ones can cause the wheel end bearing to operate under abnormal or unsafe conditions, increasing wheel end bearing wear and risk of a car accident.
  • Impact damage or poor road quality – all impacts from driving through a pothole, driving over speed bumps or hitting the curbstone can damage a wheel bearing and reduce its lifespan.
  • Poor quality wheel bearing – a wheel bearing is continuously under enormous pressure. Wheel bearings constructed of low-quality materials can have poor heat-treatment, resulting in premature wear and failure.
  • Driving conditions – driving through deep water or mud can cause your wheel bearings to fail. Water, mud or other contaminants such as dust or road salt could get past the seals and enter the bearing, polluting the grease and wearing away the bearings.
  • Car modifications – fitting bigger or wider rims, tires with lower thread walls, stiffer shock absorbers and suspension springs cause higher loads on the wheel bearing and can accelerate wear. Stick to rims, tires, shock absorbers and springs that are specified by the car manufacturer to minimize the impact on the longevity of the wheel bearings.
source How long do wheel bearings last?.
Its probably the worst road condition here in my country.
Car is all stock and still on factory hubs.
Thanks for the inputs! Very much appreciated
 

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2003 Forester
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130 Posts
I agree that improper installation can cause problems. The knuckle, if the ID is out of round from forcefully and harshly removing the WB.

Having the right tools to press out a WB carefully is IMHO, very important. If you look at some of the Subaru special tools, they are basically press out tools. Going Neanderthal on a WB install will not help. See: Hub Shocker. Awful tool.

The hub shocker is for removal. Who cares how Neanderthal the method is you just want it out. A new bearing should go in by hand.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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1,219 Posts
Yes. They make pretty good suspension components for a decent price. Between NTN and Mevotech for a bearing, I would pick the NTN which will have been made in Japan rather than China. That said I note the Mevotech along with the SKP and Timken are among the most bought parts in their category at RockAuto. So I would say that lots of people have used them with good results. I am about to install Mevotech Control arms on my 2011 for what it's worth.
 

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2016 Forester AT
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes. They make pretty good suspension components for a decent price. Between NTN and Mevotech for a bearing, I would pick the NTN which will have been made in Japan rather than China. That said I note the Mevotech along with the SKP and Timken are among the most bought parts in their category at RockAuto. So I would say that lots of people have used them with good results. I am about to install Mevotech Control arms on my 2011 for what it's worth.
well, NTN have been out of stocked recently so thats out of the picture. Now my choices have change to OE vs Mevotech which is almost on the same price. :(
 
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