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2019 Tacoma TRD OR 4x4 6AT
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Anecdotal evidence, but this was the first day the engine ran, only a few miles on it:



Few thousand miles later, no oil being burned, runs fine:



I'll probably pull it apart some time soon to take the heads off to re-use on a larger engine. I can take pictures of rings/cylinders if you want.

Stan
Good to know! Thanks for sharing :icon_cool:
 

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2015 Impreza 5-Door Sport Auto (CVT)
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You are wrong. The manual clearly indicates what is normal and not normal, yet many here seem to think they know more than the car maker. I looked up what the maker of the other boxer engines say in their manual and it clearly states "Make a habit of checking engine oil with every refueling, add if necessary."

Yet why do people wait until the idiot light goes on? Do they know more than the people who make the cars?

That's fine. Complain all you want. It will not change a thing.

The Internet is strewn with articles on new cars burning oil. Don't do your due diligence, then don't buy it. Example

Consumer Reports sees oil vanish from some test cars

Burning Oil in a Brand New Car | The CarGurus Blog

Consumer Reports: As MPG rises cars using more motor oil between oil changes | Peace . Gold . LOVE

Why Does My Subaru Use Oil? :

Subaru Repair Seattle: 2013 Subaru Legacy & Outback Oil Use Explained :

Subaru sued over vehicles' oil burning

Piston Slap: Do New Cars Burn Oil? | The Truth About Cars


Some of these complaints seem to stem from people coming from other cars without boxer engines and who just blindly seem to think that whatever happened in the past will happen in the future.

I am not defending Subaru but it is what it is. Lesson learned. Buy something else and next time do your due diligence.

For the OP, I understand your frustration. Anyone might not like it.
twi I personally understand where you are coming from, but the mystery is why do some '14 Foresters 2.5 engines consume oil and some don't? Not all 2.5 FB engines consume oil, what is different in these engines compared to the ones that do consume oil?
 

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2015 Forester XT Touring auto
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twi I personally understand where you are coming from, but the mystery is why do some '14 Foresters 2.5 engines consume oil and some don't? Not all 2.5 FB engines consume oil, what is different in these engines compared to the ones that do consume oil?
Now that, Tony, is an entirely different, and valid, question.

The constant whining here and disbelief that the manual is correct just amazes me. Particularly so when other car makers say the same thing.

But to this question, I can render a "guess" in that is not a single thing, but a combination of things.

1. By design, boxer engines inherently burn oil. Someone posted an explanation here somewhere but basically the flat design means the oil does not all drain into the sump. Nothing new here. If you read the manuals of the other boxer engine car maker, the exact same types are warnings are there. Do you think Porsche flat six owners alway carry a bottle of oil with them? Take a look at this. Mobil 1 Oil Bag:porsche Parts & Porsche Accessories - Wholesale Porsche Parts & Tequipment

Imagine that, a bag just to stash a bottle of oil. hmm. I wonder why.

2. I don't think the trend to zero weight oil has helped anything other than to get fractions more MPG. Consumer Reports sees oil vanish from some test cars

"Our latest car drinking oil is our $105,000 2012 Porsche Panamera, which is consuming a quart of 0W-40 motor oil about every 2,000 miles. ... When we talked to Porsche about this, they said this usage was within spec. .... Auto engineers have told me they see no correlation between today's lightweight "0W-" motor oils, designed to reduce friction and save gas, and excessive oil consumption. But in our admittedly anecdotal experience, both the prevalence of such lightweight oils and the propensity of more engines to consume oil seem to be moving in tandem. And our test cars that have had this problem have all used such lightweight synthetic oils."

3. Quality control. Of course only Subaru can answer this but do all of these engines fall under the same specs and exactly what are they? Are the tight enough to stop oil burners? Are some corners cut?

4. Auto usage patterns. Many people never let their oil get up to temperature. Many people get in their car in the morning, drive a few miles to work. The car sits all day, drive a few miles home. Sits. Drive maybe 6 or 7 miles to the grocery store. Sits. Drives home 7 miles. Sits. And the oil NEVER gets up to temperature.

Then there are the weekends. Run 3 or 4 errands in the same town. The car starts maybe 8 - 10 times, and the oil never gets up to temperature. There is a reason this is called "severe service".

So water and fuel get into the oil. The oil looks fine. Then one day they get on the highway. Drive an hour and the water boils off. They get home and the idiot light goes off. It goes off because the oil was NEVER full. It had been diluted all long but they think it suddenly burned a quart. No, it burnt it over the course of all those small trips.

So I don't think its just one thing. Its a combination of

QC,
inherent engine design,
user car usage, and
zero weight oil

But what is going on is that a flock of non-car enthusiasts who couldn't tell a V4 from an I4 from a flat 4 from a V12 suddenly buy these cars because Motor Trends calls it SUV of the Year. So they flock from their Ford Escapes, Toyota RAV4s, Nissan Rogues, and Honda CRVs and start complaining about a new set of problems they never heard of before. Of course, their old carmaker had their own problems like Nissan Rogues and Jukes, I believe, had serious timing chain problems with blown engines.

Where once Subaru was a niche carmaker known within the snow belt, now you got people buying it who would never consider it in the past and their expectations are not the expectations original set of niche Subaru owners.

In the end, this will damage the brand. Coming from Toyota and Hondas, known "generally" for reliability and they sell TONS of those cars, these buyers won't tolerate, in the long run, their expectations not being met. So they will leave with a sour taste in their mouths. It will take a few years as right now Subaru is still riding the good will from Motor Trend.

Just read what is written in this thread. People will not tolerate that they have to actually check their oil? Who checks their oil levels in 2014? Well Subaru do. Imagine that.

There is a reason a company like Toyota is the largest carmaker in the world and if a niche company wants to expand, IMO, they will need to solve these kinds of problems. When Motor Trend of C&D or whoever announces that the all new and improved Ford Escape or Nissan Rogue is the next SUV of the Year, those that are complaining or disillusioned about their foresters will leave and buy the next great thing.

That is how most American consumers think. What have you done for me lately. The brand loyalists will never leave. Fanboys always stay. But not the people who view autos as appliances. They will leave. You have a choice.

Sad. :icon_cry:
 

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2019 Forester CVT
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Since this is clearly in the manual, then why did anyone who finds this not acceptable buy a car where the car maker clearly indicates it is acceptable?

Did you think maybe they were lying?

Didn't want to believe it?

I am trying to understand the thought process here.

Manual: 1 qrt every 1200 miles is OK

Buyer: I'll ignore that and then complain if it happens

????? :confused::confused::confused:
I have never had to read a owners manual before I bought a vehicle. Maybe I should have but supposedly Subaru makes quality vehicles.
Like I said, if this vehicle starts using excessive oil or blows a HG it's gone and I'll never buy another Subaru again.

Dan
 

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2014 328i xDrive Wagon 8 spd Auto
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I can tell you for a fact that on their 2014 2.0L DIT engines BMW recommends you carry a quart in the trunk/hatch. For when the oil light comes on. They even sell a cute little zipper kit that includes storage for a litre of oil, some throw-away plastic gloves and a paper funnel. They expect the engine to use oil and expect the owners to be prepared for it.
 

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2015 Forester XT Touring auto
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I have never had to read a owners manual before I bought a vehicle.
And that is exactly why some VCR somewhere is still blinking 12:00 12:00 12:00 ...

I can tell you for a fact that on their 2014 2.0L DIT engines BMW recommends you carry a quart in the trunk/hatch. For when the oil light comes on. They even sell a cute little zipper kit that includes storage for a litre of oil, some throw-away plastic gloves and a paper funnel. They expect the engine to use oil and expect the owners to be prepared for it.
Exactly Mobil 1 Oil Bag:porsche Parts & Porsche Accessories - Wholesale Porsche Parts & Tequipment
 

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2015 Forester XT Touring cvt
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And that is exactly why some VCR somewhere is still blinking 12:00 12:00 12:00 ...







Exactly Mobil 1 Oil Bag:porsche Parts & Porsche Accessories - Wholesale Porsche Parts & Tequipment

Enough, already. Get over the fact that Subaru is marketing to a broader audience than in previous years, and that not everyone purchasing the vehicles today is an obsessed fanboy. Criticism of more typical vehicle owners as deficient because they don't behave like you would or do is fine, in small doses. You have made your point, but you haven't impressed everybody, and won't. Now retire and go check your oil or read your manual, please. It's Sunday, we all need a day of rest.
Thank you.



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Enough, already. Get over the fact that Subaru is marketing to a broader audience than in previous years, and that not everyone purchasing the vehicles today is an obsessed fanboy. Criticism of more typical vehicle owners as deficient because they don't behave like you would or do is fine, in small doses. You have made your point, but you haven't impressed everybody, and won't. Now retire and go check your oil or read your manual, please. It's Sunday, we all need a day of rest.
Thank you.



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Exactly.
 

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2015 Forester 2.5i CVT
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Nearly every car forum has that one issue that has been singled out. My Audi TDI, the high pressure fuel pump; Murano, coolant/head gasket issues; Cayman, clutch/gearbox; and the Sube, oil burning. You will be hard pressed to find a car without this phenomena. These are real issues; however the percentage of people actually affected is usually very small but, understandably, very vocal.
My humble opinion in the Sube's case is car manufactures are pushing the engineering envelope to squeeze out mpg. I think their fault is using buyers as beta testers under the pressure to raise those numbers. They may have tried a low friction ring system/design to achieve this goal... that unfortunately had failure rate just high enough to be noticed and affect consumers. They noticed this design issue and implemented a solution. My '15 2.5l is burning no oil, even under high speed, long duration use. But, who's to say that because my rings are slightly higher friction I am getting worse fuel economy than if I burned a quart every few thousand miles? Also, don't buy any car the first production year.
 

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2014 328i xDrive Wagon 8 spd Auto
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I'll toss in the only comments I'm going to make as this is heading toward a Nabisco thread....

1) Be happy there's still a dipstick. Checking it a couple times a month shouldn't cause anyone personal injury.

2) For those of us who have grown up driving everything from RWD "3 on the tree" to 6 spd manual diesels, to turbo CVT's, for many of us maintenance is ingrained. It's automatic. I even check my tire pressure twice a month and that's a bigger PITA than checking the oil. This is one area most manufactures could help with by displaying the tire pressure the TPMS sensors see, as the Nissan I drove in Iceland earlier this month did.

3) Are the oil specs covered in **MOST** manufacturer's Owner's Manuals a bid to cover their butts and discourage the average user from pursuing warranty fixes? You bet. But - it is there to be read. People don't want to read it, that's their choice and their right. I only worry about what I do, which actually gives me plenty to worry about.

4) Does Subaru really have a handle on the fix? Only time will tell.

5) Will it damage the brand's reputation? Distinctly possible, although if I were looking for what's probably one of, if not the best AWD car on the market, I'd be wiling to roll the dice. In fact I did knowing head gaskets were an issue.

6) Bottom line, if you can't live with the oil consumption, and Subaru can't fix it to your satisfaction, live with it, trade it, or join the litigation bandwagon.

7) Am I a fanboy? After 12 years of Subaru's my wife and I both left the brand for different reasons, which I'll be happy to expound upon, to join the "dark side", i.e. BMW.

Back to your regularly schedule programming.
 

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You know, if you are going to claim something is "excessive," there has to be a baseline that is accepted and agreed-upon.

There is no industry standard for oil consumption. The standard is not "my last three cars" or whatever.

So, in the absence of such a standard, if there is a manufacturer sprcification for acceptable oil consumption, that's the baseline.

And, lo and behold, there is. Which would seem to me to be the end of the story. If your vehicle fails to meet the manufacturer's specs, you have an issue.
 
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