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2014 Forester 2.5i
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw this on the passenger side of the short block by the alternator while doing oil change. How bad is it?
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2010 X Limited, 2.5L NA, 4AT. Purchased as the second owner in 2020 with ~126K miles.
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525 Posts
Is this putty?
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2014 Forester 2.5i
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13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@donkpow I honestly don't know as we bought the car used.

Here's a close up picture of the area your arrow pointed to:
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2010 X Limited, 2.5L NA, 4AT. Purchased as the second owner in 2020 with ~126K miles.
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525 Posts
The whole thing looks like somebody covered it up with putty.
 

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2014 Forester 2.5i
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13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Does this mean I am looking at a short block replacement then? If so, will have to start saving up some money.
 

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2016 Forester
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17 Posts
Are you suspecting that this engine had a massive impact in the past?t Or this is a metal fatiguing issue that should be covered by Subaru?

If I were you, I would start collecting info about similar issues online. I'll also speak to someone in the dealership without taking the car for inspection. I'd exhaust every possibility for the root cause of this before thinking of how much I should start saving!

This has just reminded me of the last Subaru mail I received last month talking about possible cracking in the steering system!

Keep us posted please.

Cheers..
 

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2021 Forester Limited
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321 Posts
If you see an oil seepage, then I would worry. Till then you are OK. Some casting just look this way.
Except for the "putty" looking spot, I have also seen castings that have those random lines on the surface. Most likely caused by the casting mold surface.
 

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'14 Forester XT Touring
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874 Posts
Oh.... Well I'll keep an eye on it every oil change. If oil is coming out of it, then it's time to worry. For now it doesn't seem too bad. I would plan for the worse just in case it goes south sooner than expected.
 

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2019 Forester Sport Lineartronic® CVT
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401 Posts
Alluminum cast in sand molds often picks up even the crack line of the sand mold, like some concrete shows the grain of the wood used in the forms. You could take a file or sandpaper and just file or sand down smooth a section to see if the line vanishes or not. That smear looks almost like cured JBWeld, possibly was someone thinking they were covering a leak as seapage will sometimes follow those lines.
 

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2010 X Limited, 2.5L NA, 4AT. Purchased as the second owner in 2020 with ~126K miles.
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The area under consideration looks like it is a big 'block' of aluminum where a couple of 'legs' come together and get a bolt through it. This area is going to be thicker than anyplace else. What I would be most concerned about is a crack around where the bolt goes through. Or where each of the legs come into the 'block' of metal. It's not likely that the whole 'block' would shatter.
 

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2010 X Limited, 2.5L NA, 4AT. Purchased as the second owner in 2020 with ~126K miles.
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Here's the cracks that disturb me. I can't see if they are through or not. At a leg and through the bolt hole.
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2010 X Limited, 2.5L NA, 4AT. Purchased as the second owner in 2020 with ~126K miles.
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I was thinking, which is not always a good thing for me. :) I've done a thing elsewhere that goes like this. Find a crack. Put a thin coating to lay over the crack of something like JB Weld. Let it cure completely. If the crack comes through the epoxy at some future date, you know you have a break under the epoxy. If the crack doesn't come through, you know it is just a surface blemish. The thin coating has to be kind of brittle because we want it to crack to indicate. If it's too soft, it will just stretch with the metal.
 

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2019 Forester Limited
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In case anyone is curious, the standard test for evaluating possible cracks like this is a dye penetrant test. It’s not something you or I can do reliably, but it’s what industry frequently uses to identify surface cracks in castings, welds, etc. It’s relatively inexpensive, by industry standards, but still out of reach for most of us. Google if you’re interested in that sort of thing.
 

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2019 Forester Limited
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Question remains, Why did the previous owner apply the “patch”? Did he patch a crack, or did he patch something that only looked like a crack?

No leaks, so just keep an eye on it?
 

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2021 Forester Limited
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Or is the "patch" just an anomaly in the casting?
Maybe they patched the mold, and it in turn looks like a patch.
 
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