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Premium Member
2017 Forester XT CVT (High Torque)
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203 Posts
Tire pressure was checked @ 50 psi, recommended.
Where did you get this number? The recommended PSI for the tires should be on a sticker on the driver side door well that you can read with the door open. The PSI rating you see on the sidewalk of the tire is the MAXIMUM PSI that the tire can safely be inflated to without risking catastrophic failure.

If you are driving around with your tires pumped up to 50 PSI that would explain the crazy behavior. Figure out what your tires are supposed to be set for according to the manufacturer recommendations on the sticker (and also in the owners manual). I’m general that will be around 32PSI for the Foresters, depending on model and year. Going +/- 2 PSI according to your preferences is OK, but DO NOT look at the sidewall of the tire, that is not where to find the correct value.

Be safe out there!
 

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Premium Member
2017 Forester XT CVT (High Torque)
Joined
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203 Posts
I just realized that this thread was many years old, and had been revived due to some people recently responding. Still, there were some crazy responses with regard to tire pressures, so I’m glad that my responses will be in the thread for posterity.

Im sitting here shaking my head thinking about people driving around in the snow with wildly overinflated tires and blaming the vehicle dynamics control for not keeping them from experiencing a horrible accident.
 

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2018 Forester
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171 Posts
I usually slow down my hiway speed when they're icy. The only time my DVC kicks in is when I accelerate a little too much taking off. That's the reason I asked about the cruise being engaged on icy roads since mine only does it under acceleration. With or w/o driver assist using cruise on icy roads is foolish IMO.
 

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2012 Forester X Auto
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1,382 Posts
I always turn off the VDC control in environments where there can be a lot of wheel slippage.. because these systems don't work in those conditions.
It's not a Subaru fault, it's just the way the systems function.
Wheel slip is assessed by the system by reference to the other wheels and power/braking is used to bring that rogue wheel into rotational alignment with the others.
In an environment where everything is slipping (e.g. mud/ice) there are no valid references for the system to align to, so it can have "unexpected" results.
 
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