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2014 2.5i Touring CVT
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a '14 Touring model with alloys, and it is time to rotate tires/wheels.

Is there a published torque spec on the lug nuts for the '14 models? after searching here, I've seen 67.5 ft-lbs for steel wheels on earlier models, and 80 ft-lbs for previous model years with alloys...

also, what are the rotation positions - front to back, or cross-front to back? I know part of it would depend on if there are uni-directional tires, obviously.
 

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2015 Highlander AWD XLE 6AT
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The 2014 Forester wheel lug torque spec is 89 lb-ft. See page 12-9 in the OM; there's no distinction between steel wheels and alloy wheels.

See 2014 OM page 11-28 for recommended tire rotation patterns. For regular ol' tires (i.e., the OEM tires), it's front-to-back on the same sides, and back-to-front changing sides.

HTH,
Jim / crewzer
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks, Jim... just trying to plan some routine preventative maintenance, wife has the fozzie right now so the OM is with it.
 

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It's funny how the number seems to keep going up every year, and for no apparent reason.
 

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It's funny how the number seems to keep going up every year, and for no apparent reason.
I agree.

The lug sizes haven't changed (M12x1.25). The lug material hasn't changed (8.8 - nothing really special). The torque should be ~65 ft-lbs dry.

Grease your wheel studs and reduce the torque to 50 ft-lbs. That way, you can get them off, without losing your good humor, if you ever have to change the tire on the roadside.
 

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thanks, Jim... just trying to plan some routine preventative maintenance, wife has the fozzie right now so the OM is with it.
Understood. The OM's (in sections) are also available online.

HTH, and best of luck!
Jim / crewzer
 

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It's funny how the number seems to keep going up every year, and for no apparent reason.
I agree.

The lug sizes haven't changed (M12x1.25). The lug material hasn't changed (8.8 - nothing really special). The torque should be ~65 ft-lbs dry.
I don't recall seeing any reports of an epidemic of Subaru wheels falling off. Maybe the lawyers made them do it, just in case. 68 ft lb is in the prescribed range for 2003, and with a 2' breaker bar it works for my wife, so I'm sticking with it.
 

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2007 none auto
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I wonder why torque specs vary so much between cars and trucks.. The torque spec on my full sized pickups and SUVs have been 110+ lb/ft ... cars seem to always be up to 90 lb/ft...
 

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2007 Forester XT
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As a personal rule of thumb, I torque my lug nuts & bolts to 90 ft-lbs on all of my cars, and have for years. Never had any problems with my lug nuts or studs on any of my cars.
 

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2012 XT Touring 4EAT
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As a personal rule of thumb, I torque my lug nuts & bolts to 90 ft-lbs on all of my cars, and have for years. Never had any problems with my lug nuts or studs on any of my cars.
Gross overkill. You're probably stretching the lugs.

Determine the size and thread of the fastener. Look on the internet (or in a machinest's manual or in a dozen other places) for the recommended torque for that size and thread fastener.

Seriously consider greasing the lugs and reducing the torque. -It makes it a lot easier (or even possible!) to change a tire on the side of the road. And, it reduces the chance of the lug nut seizing to the wheel. You might add a cheater pipe to your on-vehicle tool kit to extend the short handle of the on-vehicle lug wrench.

For steel lugs with steel nuts, torque is not that critical. But 90 ft-lbs is a lot of torque - probably too much. Too much going on and too hard to get it off after it has rusted or corroded to the wheel over the winter.
 

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Regarding greasing are you recommenting grease be applied to the nut threads? Would lithium grease suffice?
 

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Gross overkill. You're probably stretching the lugs.
If I were, it would be causing problems over time. On the cars I autocross, I've swapped wheels/tires dozens of times a year. Zero problems.
 

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Regarding greasing are you recommenting grease be applied to the nut threads? Would lithium grease suffice?
Apply it to the threads, the nuts, doesn't matter.

If I'm in a good mood, I'll use anti-seize compound, but it's not necessary. With steel wheels, there is no "different metals" issue. Alloy wheels might seems like an issue but they seem to be fairly stable.

Regular cup grease works fine. Lithium - white grease - works okay too but it's fairly light in weight.
 

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If I were, it would be causing problems over time. On the cars I autocross, I've swapped wheels/tires dozens of times a year. Zero problems.
You probably won't have a problem... right up until the time the stud snaps off. At 90 ft-lbs, that might never happen.

But why do this? It just makes the wheels harder to take off and on, and serves no purpose. The lug nuts don't provide anymore grip or strength at 90 ft-lbs than they do at 60. All you're doing is just elongating the studs a little more. For an 8.8 grade stud, I don't know when the stud will permanently deform, but that information is certainly available.
 

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2014 2.5i Touring CVT
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Apply it to the threads, the nuts, doesn't matter.

If I'm in a good mood, I'll use anti-seize compound, but it's not necessary. With steel wheels, there is no "different metals" issue. Alloy wheels might seems like an issue but they seem to be fairly stable.

Regular cup grease works fine. Lithium - white grease - works okay too but it's fairly light in weight.
I'm no mechanical engineer, but I've read several places where using anti-seize compound on torqued nuts/bolts actually increases the torque applied - including a sister forum owned by AG/VS where I moderate.
 

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2008 Forester X Premium 5MT
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I'm no mechanical engineer, but I've read several places where using anti-seize compound on torqued nuts/bolts actually increases the torque applied - including a sister forum owned by AG/VS where I moderate.
The factory torque specs for the lugs are dry(no lube, grease, anit seize, oil ...) Any time you add lube to a fastener you make it easier to achieve the target pre-load. So it takes less indicated torque on your wrench to get there.

If you were to tighten the fastener speced as a dry install to the same indicated torque on your wrench after applying lube to it, you will actually be over torquing the fastener going beyond the target pre-load. Potentially causing damage to it or the components it is securing.

This is one thing that can cause stripped nut, bolts or holes. By lubing and not reducing the indicated torque used you risk overloading the threads.

Granted this is a marketing video but it hits on a some of those points.
Why Use ARP Ultra-Torque Fastener Assembly Lubricant - YouTube

http://benmlee.com/4Runner/threads/threads.htm
 

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But I do apply anti-seize to the places where the rims make contact. I learned this after having a horrible time getting my snow tires off a few years ago, and now it's a part of every seasonal swap.
 

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Hmm. Torque the lug nuts with a torque wrench? Huh?
Ya, I torque mine with the little wrench that comes with the car..
SO I CAN GET THEM OFF WHEN I'M IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE WITH A FLAT TIRE!
 

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2009 Forester AT
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I have both my owners manual and navigation manual on my smart phone. It's very handy since my phone (Galaxy Note 2) is always with me!
 

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2014 2.5i Touring CVT
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hmm. Torque the lug nuts with a torque wrench? Huh?
Ya, I torque mine with the little wrench that comes with the car..
SO I CAN GET THEM OFF WHEN I'M IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE WITH A FLAT TIRE!
I'll argue that most of the people on this forum can take off a lug nut (that's been torqued properly, with a torque wrench) using the factory wrench.

I feel better when I know that certain components are torqued to spec. wheels are one, brakes are another. I've seen what happens when they are not, and it ain't pretty.
 
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