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2011 Forester
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34 Posts
Please use this format when reporting oil consumption.


How is the consumption from?:

1. 0 miles to 1,875 miles.

2. 1,875 miles to 3,750(severe service interval).

Then for those continuing on and doing the normal service interval.

3. 3,750 miles to 5,625 miles.

4. 5,625 miles to 7,500 miles.

I don't mean total accumulated consumption at those points either, just consumption from point to point with a notation for make up oil amounts.

So it would look some thing like this:


Oil brand, Mobil 1 Oil type, Advanced Fuel Economy(AFE) Weight, 0w20
Consumption amount/make up amount added

1. 0 miles to 1,875 miles. 0/0

2. 1,875 miles to 3,750(severe service interval). ¼/¼

Then for those continuing on and doing the normal service interval.

3. 3,750 miles to 5,625 miles. ½/½

4. 5,625 miles to 7,500 miles. 1½/0(you're changing it why add)

Total consumption = 2¼qtsMake up = ¾qt

I say this way because following some of the forums I am seeing some members average it out to a linear consumption rate when it is not. They are using nothing or little from oil change to 3,750 but between 3,750 and 7,500 they may have added 2qts and are reporting they are seeing consumption of around ¼qt / 1,000 miles.

To me seeing a non- linear consumption rate like that would seem to be a likely indicator that the oil is contaminated, additives are breaking down, volatility is going up... and no longer able to do its job and one should think about shortening their OCI on that particular oil and with those driving conditions to maybe 5,625.

Following a layout like this allows every one to see the oil brand, type, weight being used and when the consumption is occurring.




2011 is burning a lot of oil (Premium- non turbo). It's going into the dealer but he told me the owners manual states that 1 quart every 1, 200 is "acceptable." Are they trying to cover themselves by putting it in print? I didn't even get the manual until after purchase. I think it is burning more than that but even 1 quart every 1, 200 under light driving conditions (no excessive weight and no towing) is clearly not acceptable. Why should a brand new engine, now with about 10k on the clock be burning about a quart a month- minimum. So according to their math, if I can go 7k between oil changes, I will have had to add about 7-9 quarts or oil before I even do my oil change? This makes no sense and gets costly fast since it requires full synthetic 0w20. I can only imagine this issue will get worse as the engine gets older too. This is not what I expected from a new vehicle. You buy a new vehicle to avoid these issues. I have another 10 year old vehicle (not a subaru) that has never burned a drop.

Has anyone else in here been burning this much oil- about 1 quart or more every few week- or about every 1, 000. What can I do to address this with Subaru directly if the dealer tells me it is within the acceptable range. Have there been any recalls on the '11's to address this issue? I was not told about this issue prior to buying the vehicle. I don't even think it's good for the environment to be putting a quart of oil into the air every few weeks. Many cars can go 5-7k without burning a drop of oil. Is it just this Forester or are all the 2011's with the new motor burning at such a high rate.
 

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Premium Member
2019 Forester Touring
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3,006 Posts
My guess? Either some one "demo'ed" your car off the lot before you came along and bought it........OR...it was defective from the factory with a broken ring as Stan says.....

I've seen potential buyers take a car out to "test", then they choose to order a car or wait for one in a specific color...leaving the demo as a badly broken-in "new" car that the dealer then tries to see to the next customer........like, maybe, you(?). Not saying that the dealer is being dishonest, all they care about, in general, is moving the cars off the lot.

Complain, this is NOT right. My 03X with 134K mile uses about 1/3 of a quart every 4000 miles.......and I broke my Forrie in very carefully.

Steve
 

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Premium Member
2019 Crosstrek 2018 Forester XT
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15,117 Posts
1200 miles per quart is not acceptable.

1000 miles/quart is a holdover from 60/70 years ago and became a convenient tool to keep new owners from annoying dealers because of their defective cars.
 

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I am observing something similar, using app. 1 liter/quart every 4000km/2500 miles.
2011 NA Touring Package purchased in Canada in March.
Changed the oil at 5000km, it was low than but I did not check the level when I purchased the car (changed the oil at the same dealer).
My next trip to the dealership will be interesting.
Thanks for any comments/suggestions.
 

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2011 Touring Manual
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32 Posts
My 2011 NA used about 700ml (0.75 quarts) during break in, up to about 3500kms (2190mi). Even this seems like a lot to me. I am keeping an eye on things to see how it progresses. I wonder if there is something unique about the 2011 engine and the recommended oil viscosity that might make oil consumption more prevalent.
 

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1998 Forester S
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7 Posts
you also have the first year of a new engine.... have to think about that too. I would look in your owner's manual and see if it's acceptable to run 5w20 or 5w-30 in your climate/temperature range. I HATE zero weight. that means that at 212*f, your engine oil has the same viscosity as EFFING WATER!!! 5w-20 has 5x the viscosity of water at 212*f which is still rather thin, without effecting the cold weight, which is 20x viscosity of water at 32*f.

also, my 1990 ej22 legacy with 188k on it uses 1 quart 10w-30 every 1500 miles. truly unacceptable from a brand new forester. call Subaru of America
 

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2011 2.5X
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50 Posts
At 3 months and 5700 km my oil level is still at the full mark for my 2.5X. I do mostly city driving during the week and 200+ km highway on the weekends.

I was in at the dealer for wheel balancing last week and asked if I should change the oil now and they said no and to come back at 8000 km. I also asked about oil for topping up if needed and they said use 0W 20 synthetic as specified in the owners manual.
 

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10 XT 4EAT
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893 Posts
you also have the first year of a new engine.... have to think about that too. I would look in your owner's manual and see if it's acceptable to run 5w20 or 5w-30 in your climate/temperature range. I HATE zero weight. that means that at 212*f, your engine oil has the same viscosity as EFFING WATER!!! 5w-20 has 5x the viscosity of water at 212*f which is still rather thin, without effecting the cold weight, which is 20x viscosity of water at 32*f.

also, my 1990 ej22 legacy with 188k on it uses 1 quart 10w-30 every 1500 miles. truly unacceptable from a brand new forester. call Subaru of America
Sorry, but you don't quite understand the oil ratings. 0w20 and 5w20 will have near identical viscosity at operating temperature, the difference comes at 'cold' temperatures. At 'cold' temperatures, the 0w20 will be less viscous (less thick) then the 5w20, and thus will flow better and reach operating viscosity sooner then the 5w20.

For a good explation of oil rating and characteristics, read through this: Motor Oil 101
 

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Premium Member
2019 Crosstrek 2018 Forester XT
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15,117 Posts
Sorry, but you don't quite understand the oil ratings. At 'cold' temperatures, the 0w20 will be less viscous (less thick) then the 5w20, and thus will flow better and reach operating viscosity sooner then the 5w20. [/URL]
And to take it further, at 50 F viscosity the 0W oil is about 150 cSt. compared to 8 cSt. at 200F (operating temp)
 

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2010 XT Premium
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33 Posts
Don't worry about the 'maybe somebody demo'd your car before you bought it' as this could have been a godsend if you follow the proper technique for running in engines. The old school of thought of taking it easy has been dispelled many times with dyno results. A famous race engine builder explains in detail how to properly break in an engine but to summarise you warm the engine to operating temp then through a serious of big throttle opening you LOAD the engine up. No revving the bejesus out of it but LOADING it up. What this does is forces the pistons rings into the cyclinder wall and creates the seal. Once the seal is set your engine will produce more power and run well for many many years. It's engines that have not had this intitial seal made that burn oil and don't produce proper power. A new engine needs to marry together through wear. That's why today most new cars/bikes are run on the dyno before leaving the factory and they are RUN properly through the gears and loaded up. Apparently this process needs to happen in about the first hour of engine running. Suzuki, so I've read, run their bike engines hard before leavign the factory to bed them in and if the engine is going to let go better at the factory than with the customer. So - maybe your engine wasn't bedded in properly and you took it very easy on it in the first hour. Now your ring seal isn't optimal and she's burning more oil. Just a thought.
Have a read:-
**************************
What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ??
The Short Answer: Run it Hard !

Why ??
Nowadays, the piston ring seal is really what the break in process is all about. Contrary to popular belief, piston rings don't seal the combustion pressure by spring tension. Ring tension is necessary only to "scrape" the oil to prevent it from entering the combustion chamber.

If you think about it, the ring exerts maybe 5-10 lbs of spring tension against the cylinder wall ...
How can such a small amount of spring tension seal against thousands of
PSI (Pounds Per Square Inch) of combustion pressure ??
Of course it can't.

How Do Rings Seal Against Tremendous Combustion Pressure ??

From the actual gas pressure itself !! It passes over the top of the ring, and gets behind it to force it outward against the cylinder wall. The problem is that new rings are far from perfect and they must be worn in quite a bit in order to completely seal all the way around the bore. If the gas pressure is strong enough during the engine's first miles of operation (open that throttle !!!), then the entire ring will wear into
the cylinder surface, to seal the combustion pressure as well as possible.


The Problem With "Easy Break In" ...
The honed crosshatch pattern in the cylinder bore acts like a file to allow the rings to wear. The rings quickly wear down the "peaks" of this roughness, regardless of how hard the engine is run.

There's a very small window of opportunity to get the rings to seal really well ... the first 20 miles !!

If the rings aren't forced against the walls soon enough, they'll use up the roughness before they fully seat. Once that happens there is no solution but to re hone the cylinders, install new rings and start over again.

Fortunately, most new sportbike owners can't resist the urge to "open it up" once or twice,
which is why more engines don't have this problem !!

An additional factor that you may not have realized, is that the person at the dealership who set up your bike probably blasted your brand new bike pretty hard on the "test run". So, without realizing it, that adrenaline crazed set - up mechanic actually did you a huge favor !!

************************************
 

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2009 Forester
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13 Posts
I'm currently having this same problem with my 2009. It didn't start until May of this year though. The last 2 oil changes that I have had done there has been only about 2 quarts left in the car. I've always followed my maintenance and done my oil changes regularly. The dealership also told me that I could go 7500 miles between oil changes and have no problems of which I was doing. The only difference with the last 2 oil changes is I did go a bit over that mark on the 1st one and the one today I went to 5400 miles instead and still the same thing. No oil is leaking out, so we have figured it's burning it but why? I haven't called the dealership with this problem but plan to tomorrow.
 

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Premium Member
2019 Crosstrek 2018 Forester XT
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15,117 Posts
The last 2 oil changes that I have had done there has been only about 2 quarts left in the car. I've always followed my maintenance and done my oil changes regularly.
Well..no disrespect but when you only got 2 quarts out of a system that holds almost 5 there is a problem with your frequency of checking.
 
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