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2010 Forester Diesel 6MT
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Discussion Starter #301 (Edited)
Rescuing an Overfull (limp mode) DPF
I've recently managed to drag back an overfull DPF (>135%, the cutoff for a forced regen and activation of limp mode) to a workable state. Whether the DPF has been permanently damaged or is otherwise not reasonable workable I'm not sure yet as haven't put enough klms on it. The following is a brief synopsis of the situation, items required, techniques/theory used and the results/resolution.

If I get a chance I'll firstly post some screen grabs. After that if I really get a chance I'll write up a separate thread outlining a particular situation, what is required and how to proceed to 'rescue' the DPF.

Situation:
Overfull DPF (>135%) causing limp mode and preventing forced regens.
  • Situation caused by interminable peak-hour city driving with no relief for the poor vehicle
  • Soot level at one stage read 255%. I didn't believe it at fitrst- the believed it was likely higher but 255 is the max value for an 8-bit integer (!)
  • Car was still running OK though
Note Oil dilution and Ash levels were 0%- caused (I assume) by repeated dealer DPF resets when they previously executed forced regens (may have had to 'simulate' a new DPF to force the regen).

Items Used
  • Penrite Enviro+ DPF cleaner (fuel additive)
  • OBD-II Bluetooth dongle and Torque Pro on Android (for easy logging/display)
  • ECUTEK ProECU Tool (on Win 10 laptop)
  • Freeway with some extended/consistent hill climbs and suitable (hot) weather
  • Some loading for the car (in this case, approx 6 x 25kg sand bags) + electrical accessory loading
Techniques/theory
  • Utilise passive regen to get the soot <135% to allow a forced regen
  • Passive regen occurs/starts around 400C esp. when assisted by a DPF cleaner additive. DPF Temps >400C (under normal running) in the Forester require some load and uphill running in warm/hot conditions
  • The soot levels can be cross-checked against the DPF differential pressure
  • Once soot <135%, use ECUTEK tool to initiate forced regen
  • Once forced regen finished, check running of the car.
  • If soot cannot be brought <135% to initiate a forced regen, 'install a new' DPF (i.e. tell the car a new one's been installed) and then force the regen
  • Another alternative is to disconnect the DPF pressure pipes at the differential pressure sensor to allow the computer to rescale the soot itself (based on 0 differential pressure) before forcing a regen.
Results/Outcomes
Basically, the (pretty well) terminal soot loading was reduced to zero. All error codes cleared, car returned to 'normal' driving.
  • Soot started at 255+% in Sydney.
  • Drive to Canberra using the DPF cleaner additive reduced soot level to ~192%.
  • Note soot level firstly rose rapidly on the drive out of Canberra to the freeway hills, touching ~240%. Unloaded Forester driven up & down hills on the freeway. Before cooler weather intervened (and the DPF temp wouldn't get to 400C) the soot briefly touched a min of 130%. Returned home, soot at ~162%. Note car in limp mode limiting fuel, boost, revs but also soot production. DPF pressures ~3-4 kPa at idle, ~14-18 kPa whilst cruising and ~50+kPa worst-case accel.
  • Some extra DPF cleaner additive added plus some fuel (to bring to additive to 'cleaning' concentration) Forester loaded with sandbags (approx 150kg) and then driven in hot weather (36C) up & down hills on freeway. Extra load added through max A/C, max fan, rear demist and headlights. Again rapid soot increase to ~225% on way out. After that, at one point soot reduced to ~70%. Toilet break with soot at 90% resulted in car restarting out of limp mode- and soot back to 152% by time freeway speed was reached! Back into limp mode, more uphill runs and eventually returned home with soot starting at 90% and not climbing above ~96%. DPF pressures ~2-3 kPa at idle, 10-14 kPa whilst cruising and ~20+kPa worst-case accel.
  • Forced regen initiated in driveway using ECUTEK ProScan. Extra cooling provided through small industrial fan placed at front of car. Forced regen completes in only about 15 min. Shows minimal oil dilution (<0.5%) and soot reading showing 0%. at the end. Cool car by idling for 4-5 mins, soot then shows ~5%.
  • Drive a bit next day (e.g. to return sand bags, go to work). Driving mostly suburban and gentle highway cruising. Soot rises to 30% over approx 100km (max). DPF pressures ~0 kPa at idle, 2-3 kPa whilst cruising and ~20+kPa worst-case accel (no limp mode).
  • (Additional info) No DPF reinstall/reset/reinitialise needed, nor manipulation of DPF pressure has been required...yet! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #302
Rescuing an Overfull (limp mode) DPF cont'd

Subsequent to a forced regen, it seems that it is recommended to take the car for a good (~100km) drive to make sure the DPF is properly cleaned out. So following on from the forced regen and subsequent small drive in the post above, I had decided to take the car for a drive from Canberra to Yass and back, partly to give it a good run, partly to see if the DPf behaved itself and partly (well mostly) 'cos I wanted to go and so did my daughter :)

Canberra-Yass is approx 55-60km each way of mostly highway driving with no traffic lights so almost ideal.

Watching DPF behaviour post forced-regen
There was approx 60km on the trip meter since the last (forced) regen- I set a trip meter after each regen- and the soot was at 30%. During the drive, the soot level both rose quickly and was unstable, sometimes reducing and/or increasing dependent on throttle setting, speed, engine revs, etc. This was rather disconcerting and also worrying.

The DPF differential pressure was good near the beginning, approx 0 kPa at idle and approx 3-4 kPa under 80km/h running.

The DPF tem approached 400C and slightly exceeded it in the rather warm conditions (30+C) but didn't seem to appreciably carry out any passive regen. Note I was still running with the Penrite ENviro+ DPF DPF cleaner at 'cleaning' concentration as per the previous post. The DPF differential pressures did substantially increase towards the end.

Reported fuel economy during this period was excellent- approx 6.4l/100km (by the trip computer).

Active (normal) regen
At approx 90km (since forced regen) a self (active) regen initiated and finished just as I was coming in to Yass- perfect timing! The soot level did hang around 5% for some considerable portion of the regen period before hitting zero. Regen period was approx 20km, finishing around 110-115km. I suspect some sort of self-calibration was going on in the background (see below).

Post active regen behaviour
After morning tea and a bit of a potter around I put some diesel in to bring the DPF cleaner additive to the 'maintenance' level and we left Yass via the 'back way', involving some smooth dirt road driving ~80km/h, some full throttle accelerations in 2nd to redline, some detours and backtracks and some more highway cruising back to Canberra. As I was using maps on the tablet rather than logging I drive 'blind' to the DPF behaviour to better simulate normal driving.

I started monitoring once I was back on the highway and was very pleased to find the soot, after ~50 km to be only 5-6 % (I think, certainly less than 10%). By the time I got home after some shopping the soot was only 9 or 10% after 70km and showing stable behaviour- i.e. only slowly increasing and not reacting to throttle inputs. If it continues that way I can expect a >400km distance to next regen which seems to be acceptable for a Forester diesel.

The idle was also uneven during this period until an engine start/stop and again I suspect some calibration behaviour may have been occurring (although see P0850 park/neutral switch code below).

Conclusion
So in conclusion, although I have no long-term data (yet) here is what I believe I've found:
  • An overfull DPF can be rescued with some knowledge, understanding, patience, data logging and appropriate tools.
  • Passive regens using a DPF cleaning additive can assist in bringing the DPF to a state where it can be actively (forced) regenerated.
  • If you can't passively regen the car you may be able to 'reset the DPF' by telling the car a new one has been installed and then initiate a forced regen. Note this resets the DPF parameters e.g. ash to an unrealistically low (zero) level.
  • Once the soot level is 'back in range' (i.e. below the pre-set terminal cut-off point) a forced regen can be initiated.
  • A forced regen isn't the be-all and end-all rectification of the issue.
  • Cars (perhaps with the generally seem to require an extended drive after a forced regen to make sure the DPF is actually/properly/really clear, and perhaps as part of a 'recalibration'. I have noted this on a Mazda diesel as well and both cars possess a Denso common rail system (I believe).
  • You should change the oil after a forced regen- I did not as no regen had occurred since the last oil change and after forced plus active regens the oil dilution is only now (just) 1%.
  • Note that DPF cleaning additives are not all the same- (oils ain't oils)- apprarently (so I've heard) the iron (Fe) based ones are likely to increase your ash content. Others are (so the Penrite stuff claims) more catalyst- based (Platinum/Cerium they claim).
  • Once the active regen has completed the car is (hopefully) back to normal.
  • The above space intentionally left blank because if you've read this far you need to stop and either:
    • get a life
    • get a more reliable car
    • or both!
Unrelated (?) fly in the ointment
Just as I was within a klm or two of home, the 'check engine' and traction control lights illuminated and the cruise deactivated. the code set (pending) was P0850 - park/neutral switch- a rather interesting one on a manual vehicle! However there is gear selection knowledge on the vehicle so a neutral switch would seem to be a reasonable possibility. I think the shift mechanism was damaged early in the car's life (although it has shifted OK since) so that is a possibility. Might have to have a look.
 

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I found I always had a fair bit of oil in the Intercooler, whenever I had taken it off.

Subaru tech, crapped on about not needing one, and that the engine design has a patented system to stop/reduce oil buildup in the breather system. Whatever the truth, it doesn’t work on my car.

I put a catch can, and it collects loads of oil. Anywhere from 50ml to 300ml per tank. It collects (condenses), more since it gets cool air flow where it sits. I might suggest that the reduction in performance people are reporting (alongside DPF issues), may also be contributed to by EGR and Manifold coking.

I now use Red Line 5W40 Euro Series (hotter climate). It’s ACEA C3 rated and has better NoAck (less volatile at high temp), and HTHS (better viscosity at high temp), than other offerings that I could find. In actual fact I use a mix of Red Line’s regular 5w40, and the Euro Series, because I’m not worried about clogging up my DPF (physical properties are similar, just has the extra antiwear additives where the C3’s have less). Being an Ester based oil, the base stock has slightly better lubricity, so hopefully makes up for the lower wear additives in the C3.

I also have the new GFB V2 Manual Boost Controller (second pic). I have had settings that produce passive regen in first 3 gears around the streets (<60kph), but that’s just what Torque Pro tells me. However, those settings don’t unfortunately produce the same soot busting results at 80kph or 110kph). Other boost settings can be found where the passive regen occurs at 60, 80, or 110, and these are occurring as low as 280 Deg C.

I’m aiming for EGT’s 280-320 Deg C, and soot busting at 80kph. In most cases, if I get on the boost easily, the Soot level stays the same, or is only a slow increase. A nice balance is where it builds up a bit if you “gas it”, but then it goes down once at Cruise speed.

A dual solenoid switched system, like Darren Dawes (3 Bar Racing), now has, or an electronic controller, is probably ideal.

Busting soot as I drive, has become my own little driving game! It’s sad 😔

I’ll probably clean out the manifold one day soon. I’m just curious to how much build up there is, and if the economy gets even better after it.

527987
527988
 

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Discussion Starter #305
Rescuing an Overfull (limp mode) DPF cont'd #2

Post active regen behaviour cont'd

Another drive to Yass and back yesterday (Dec 31) under similar conditions to above (hot, highway out, country dirt + highway back) produced pleasing results.
  • Started at 13% soot at 82km since last regen
  • Arrived back at 28% soot at 213 km since last regen
  • DPF differential pressure remained commendably low, around 3kPa under constant speed on a flat surface
  • Still noted some instability in soot level with engine load/revs
So at that rate I'd probably get 500+ km between regens (it activates at 65%). Read on...

Post active regen behaviour cont'd #2
So I though I'd try something slightly different today (Jan 1). The main worry is the level of smoke in the air from bushfires, it's likely building the DPF ash simply by inducting the atmosphere currently. This run involved:
  • Some suburban highway driving (mostly 60-80km/h) in very light traffic for approx 10-20 km in warm conditions.
  • At the end I read out the soot with Torque Pro to find it at 50%. This large rise I speculate to be possibly from running with the engine cold without working glow plugs (they died a long time ago).
  • After that I did a bit of highway (80/90/100km/h) running and the soot varied about 50%.
  • I'm back at 52% soot at ~262km.
  • DPF differential pressure has come up a bit to perhaps 4, maybe 5kPa under flat road, constant speed conditions.
On that basis approx 300km between regens is a lot lower but still manageable and possibly influenced by cold starts without active glow plugs. Warm running (including starts after 30-60mins shutoff but with the blue temp light still off) only seems to show a slow rise in soot levels. To my mind this still indicates that the DPF has been 'rescued' to a workable state, at least in the short term.
 

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Very usefull tips on Subaru diesel. I want to share my findings. My subaru outback is 2012 diesel. Problems with dpf began at 280 000 km. Subaru service changed my old dpf with new but not original, but problems stayed the same low mileage between regenerations 80-110 km. Now I am getiing 600 km on highway and 480 in city driving. Of course now is winter in Lithuania, cold weather around 0 degrees, and winter diesel. There is one thing what I did but no one mentioned it in this forum. I started to change air filter more often. I drive 5000 - 7000 km and I change it. After that my dpf regens are fine. Even in summer I was gettin 400 km betweem regens. 2019 may I started to get only 150 km between regens, it was only 7000 km after oil change and air filter. All I did I changed only air filter and eventualy mileage between regens started to increase. I think it was coincidence. But I tried this with another subaru 2015 outback (220 000 km). My friends 2015 subaru was always driving on the motorways and until 200000 km regenerations where fine average 440 km between regens. But in 2019 summer he started to get only 220 km, later 180 km. All we did change air filter earlier then recomended by subaru, and regenerations occur 440 km again.
 

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Discussion Starter #307
...I started to change air filter more often. I drive 5000 - 7000 km and I change it. After that my dpf regens are fine..
Thanks for the tip Galauris. I wonder why this is- perhaps the filter is becoming contaminated. I'll have a look at mine tomorrow.

I have seen my air filter become oil contaminated on the inside side (i.e. facing the engine where the 'clean' air is supposed to be ) on an old car which obviously had a lot of blow-by and/or oil vapour getting to the intake.

If this is what is happening then it's possible the airflow is being restricted somewhat and/or perhaps the sensors (e.g. MAF- I assume the car has one) are being contaminated.

This could possibly also explain why things work better in winter as the air density is higher- although I still think things may be fuel related as winter diesel at higher temps still worked well.

I'll have a look tomorrow.
 

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Thanks for the tip Galauris. I wonder why this is- perhaps the filter is becoming contaminated. I'll have a look at mine tomorrow.

I have seen my air filter become oil contaminated on the inside side (i.e. facing the engine where the 'clean' air is supposed to be ) on an old car which obviously had a lot of blow-by and/or oil vapour getting to the intake.

If this is what is happening then it's possible the airflow is being restricted somewhat and/or perhaps the sensors (e.g. MAF- I assume the car has one) are being contaminated.

This could possibly also explain why things work better in winter as the air density is higher- although I still think things may be fuel related as winter diesel at higher temps still worked well.

I'll have a look tomorrow.
Tip with air filter looks interesting, I will check mine too. But I didn't think that winter diesel has such impact. Initially I was thinking about it as possible reason. This winter is quite strange and temperature varies quite a lot. And even with winter diesel I experience erratic DPF behavior when temperature rise above 10-15 °C. Actually here in Slovakia is freezing and I have 24% of soot and over 650km from last active regeneration. If weather will be like this I think that I will manage 1000 km or even more to another active regeneration.

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Discussion Starter #309
Firstly I've had the park/neutral switch replaced and that seems to have cured the P0880 problem with deactivated crusie control reported above.

Secondly: Does anyone have a guide reading for the MAF reading at idle on the 2l Subaru diesel?

Thanks for the tip Galauris. I wonder why this is- perhaps the filter is becoming contaminated. I'll have a look at mine tomorrow.
...
If this is what is happening then it's possible the airflow is being restricted somewhat and/or perhaps the sensors (e.g. MAF- I assume the car has one) are being contaminated.
Well tomorrow 4 months later...I had a look this evening at the air filter and MAF:

The intermittent driving I've done with the Forester since the last post (I've dragged my heels a bit on selling it) showed regens at approx 120km. Furthermore it seemed to grow soot quickly once hot, - the DPF differential pressure was lower when cold AND under running: a higher differential pressure under coasting when hot! Go figure...

So here's what I did with my trusty helper (8 y.o. daughter with an talent for technical stuff)

1) Check MAF readings- run around pre-clean
Firstly I ran the car around a bit to warm it up (and do shopping!) whilst my daughter watched the Torque Pro readings. At idle the MAF reading was ~13g/sec... this is quite high compared to a 2l petrol which at 800 rpm you would expect to be around 3-4g/sec (approx 1g/sec per 500rpm per 1l displacement). I realise diesels are different with 'no' (well no 'normal') throttle and generally run with excess air/O2 but that still seems high. In any case, the reading was a bit unstable at idle at operating temp (coolant >80C) bu that could be the EGR swapping in and out. Not helped by a seeming injector retune either. However the reading did vary from ~10-13.5g/sec which seems quite large. This included some full throttle accelerations out to close to redline in 2nd.

My daughter watched the graphs of the MAF reading, accelerator commanded value (in lieu of throttle) , engine load whilst I did the driving.

2) Cleaning

a) MAF first: it required a clean. I could see dirt on the sensors and the housing, it was a fine dust and I'll assume it's either soot,or ash from the bushfires. A clean with MAF cleaner (don't use anything else- no brake/carby/intake/throttle cleaner, etc) rendered it noticeably better- even my daughter noticed the difference.

b) Air filter check- prompted by the MAF clean. The air filter was/is quite dirty but not terminally so. However tapping on the ground showed I was right about the bushfire smoke/ash from earlier- quite a bit got tapped out of the filter. This prompted me to clean out the accumulated grass/bugs and give it a vacuum out until I source a new one. Again, my daughter noticed the difference.

3) Post-clean drive
Went for another short run, incl full throttle to almost redline in 2nd, again my daughter watched the readings. She immediately noticed they seemed to be mutch smoother especially whilst accelerating. Also the MAF readings were slightly lower and more stable at idle (w/o EGR).

Soot was at ~3-5% at beginning of process ( ~ 7km since last regen), now ~16-19% at ~65km since last regen. But that included some heavy accelerations that blew the fuel economy out.
 

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Discussion Starter #310
Does anyone have a guide reading for the MAF reading at idle on the 2l Subaru diesel?
...
Check MAF readings...
At idle the MAF reading was ~13g/sec... this is quite high compared to a 2l petrol which at 800 rpm you would expect to be around 3-4g/sec (approx 1g/sec per 500rpm per 1l displacement). However the reading did vary from ~10-13.5g/sec which seems quite large.
Thanks to MRT performance, I found out that this reading is pretty well bang-on, for a 2010 at idle ~800rpm, normal operating temp, no load it should be 11-13g/sec.

Interestingly my Mazda 3 2.2l diesel only showed ~6-7g/sec. It's possible there's a parameter miscalibration (it was on Torque) and/or EGR operative, etc.

I have an ECUTek from MRT & just got my Mazda 2.2l diesel added to the unit too, so really need to go and have a play to look at all the parameters from both cars for some fun...don't I have a funny idea of fun! :geek:
 

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Hi,

I found this video:

I found a company at my city which is doing decarbonization with the same BG stuff and I decided to try it because of erratic behavior of DPF on my Forester. Behavior becomes worse and worse each summer. First 3 years was OK but then situation changed and DPF started to be erratic at summer or at temperature above15 Celsius. If you are interested I can report back after complete air intake, engine and injectors cleaning.

I made a quick visit in the decarbonization company and I saw there BMW X3 3.0D air intake and it was even worse then the Forester on posted video. Plastic flaps were melted there... really awful...

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Discussion Starter #312
Yes, MRT (Brett Middleton in the video's company) is where I got my ECUTek unit from that allowed me to do the forced regen. He is located in Rhodes, Sydney on a main road (Concord rd) which is an ideal example of the peak-hour city driving environment NOT suited to these engines!.

Since I regenerated it and have driven it in Canberra (much more highway/freeway and I watch for regens) the car has behaved much, much better. In fact it is performing quite nicely- sharp response, good acceleration, economy is fine and you wouldn't expect it to have 220000km on the clock esp with city driving, dead DPFs et al involved in a large part of it. Mechanically I think the engine is very robust and I think Brett has also proven that with the rallying.
 

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Discussion Starter #313
Well a couple of drives recently (each week) to keep it turning over and also see if it would regenerate early still, but it's now at ~240km since last regen and still just shy of 40% soot in gentle suburban driving. So regen distance is going up and I think a couple of things may contribute to that:
a) wonder if the MAF clean helped, as apart from the obvious visual difference a quick-n-dirty plot of the MAF reading vs rpm at standstill showed a difference before vs after the clean.
b) I let the car idle for 30-60 secs or so (whilst I start up my Torque Pro monitoring) when cold and I suspect, without glow plugs, that this assists warming the engine slightly and keeping soot generation whilst cold down.
c) Maybe the DPF innards are recovering somewhat (e.g. clearing some of the leftover blockage), plus I suspect the ECU is recalibrating things since the DPF reset. It's certainly had a couple of goes at the injectors I think, the last regen never quite got to 0% (it sat on 2-3% for minutes) plus the soot level behaviour vs DPF differential pressure reading seems somewhat different- soot level not as sensitive as before to the DPF differential pressure reading.

I've noticed the soot scales with DPF pressure which scales with engine revs so if I keep it around 1800rpm this seems to minimise the soot reading. gentle acceleration is fine but full acceleration very quickly drives up the soot reading, so too driving in a lower gear than necessary for the road speed. All this seems linked to the DPF differential pressure reading behaviour so I think the aftermarket, mistreated DPF has some damage resulting in either a reduced capacity and/or a high flow rate restriction/blockage- not unexpected really. If it gets ~300km per regen given the suburban driving and the abused nature of the aftermarket DPF I'll be quite satisfied.

Fixed a few small issues too- tweaked the driver's door alignment so it closes better, cleaned the windscreen washer nozzles, redid the tyre pressures for winter (what was ~34-35psi becomes 30 when the temp drops in Canberra) and tweaked the driving light alignment.

The oil level is high (abocve full mark) but I don't believe it's oil dilution- it doesn't smell of diesel and it's been that way since the last oil change. Anyone know of a way to remove ~500ml from the sump easily (suck it out with a thin tube down the dipstick pipe? ) without having to try the drain plug?
 

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Hi!
Whats the price for the ECUTek unit? I somehow can't find where to (possibly) buy one. What else can it do besides forced regens? Injector ammount learning? DPF reset?

Anyone know of a way to remove ~500ml from the sump easily (suck it out with a thin tube down the dipstick pipe? ) without having to try the drain plug?
thats what I did when overfilled mine doing oil change. I had small plastic tube leftover and I used it with vacuum brake bleeder. I am sure a syringe would work also. do it on a warm engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #315
Hi!
Whats the price for the ECUTek unit? I somehow can't find where to (possibly) buy one. What else can it do besides forced regens? Injector ammount learning? DPF reset?
Sorry DieseForry, I forgot to respond earlier. ECUTEK are a British company I think. They should have tuners all over Europe and it is the Master tuner you buy the unit from. In Australia, that's MRT where you saw the video from.

I assume you've seen their webpage at ECUTEK.
And their Dealers page ECUTEK Dealers where you can search for a dealer near you.
  • For example, the closest tuners to Latvia will be in Lithuania, Finland, Belarus or Russia
  • The closest Master tuners to Latvia are in Finland and Russia, next Poland, Germany and Norway
I think you should go through the Master dealer if you can as they (I think) can sell you the equipment and/or setup you need.
For the price, you'll have to ask your local dealer/tuner.

Apart from DPF reset, for a Subaru it can do: Install new DPF, reset oil ratio, read ECU, read injector codes, Write injector codes. Not a huge amount, but it can get you out of DPF trouble.

Remember, it can also do other makes: BMW, VW, Mitsubishi, Mazda, Ford, Nissan plus a few others e.g. Chinese Great Wall. It's possible they could/may do more vehicles if you can submit the ROM

The process is a bit convoluted.You need the ECUTEK interface, a WIn10 laptop with 2 free USB ports, and the software.
  • The ECUTek device plugs into the car and 1 USB port, the security dongle plugs into the other USB port.
  • Yes the dongle is annoying and can be lost easily. But the benefit is you are not limited to one car- only one car at a time. So do your mates' cars, local club, etc. The only limit to the number of cars is: 1 car at a time (one dongle=1PC=1 connection) and not commercial numbers (40, 50 ,60,100, etc).
  • Once connected to your car, start the software and it tries to recognise the ECU ROM as a known version.
  • If the ROM is not known, you need to download it through the software and submit it to the company via email. In a couple of days their database is updated and you can download a new version of the software where the ROM is now 'known'.
  • If the ROM is known (or once it has downloaded and the software updated to recognise it) then you can submit your ROM ID to the tuner, who will generate a file for you and send it back to you- your computer-specific ROM file. This allows you to read out parameters and run e.g. the DPF forced regen, plus other tools.
  • To tune the car, you need to talk to the tuner- he generates the file which you can upload through the software. Yes it costs money. No you can't do it yourself (unless you get registered as a tuner- and then you'll need the commercial software I think) unless you are doing a BRZ/86 (maybe MX-5/Miata too). This stops you 'grenading' the engine due to the Dunning-Kruger effect (why P-Plate drivers think they're the best in the world), giving yourself financial heartburn and giving ECUTek a bad name.
thats what I did when overfilled mine doing oil change. I had small plastic tube leftover and I used it with vacuum brake bleeder. I am sure a syringe would work also. do it on a warm engine.
Thanks. have the large syringe, just need the thin tube. Off to the hardware store I go, I suspect- although maybe an aquarium shop may be better.
 

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Thanks, looks like a lot of work to get the ECUTek unit to run.

For the price, you'll have to ask your local dealer/tuner.
But is it a 100$, 500$ or 1000$ unit?
I have found there is VXDiag unit that works with dealer software SSM3 and that costs ~300Eur, I am sure ECUTek support would be way better, but SSM3 does and sees everything on the car.
No you can't do it yourself
Thats a -1 for the ECUTek
I have Openport 2.0 cable and I have remapped my car multiple times.

to the hardware store I go, I suspect- although maybe an aquarium shop
I used fuel tube I had left over from Webasto fuel burning heater install.
I is quite stiff plastic tube with outside diameter of 5mm. I dont know what is the max that goes through dip stick tube and I dont know how somethink soft like rubber or silicone would slide through it.
You can try hydraulics shops too
 

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2010 Forester Diesel 6MT
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Discussion Starter #317
Re: ECUTek:
But is it a 100$, 500$ or 1000$ unit?
I did quote the price in this post in this thread...you even quoted me with the price, viz:

One device at a moderate price that can remap (under control of a tuner) is the ECUTek. I have one, it let me force regen and reset the DPF to save it, instantly repaying me the purchase price of approx $500-600 for that task alone.
What is the price of the ECUTek kit?
!!!o_O!!! Price is there!!!:p
Just in case of any misunderstanding: The ECUTek ProECU kit cost me $500-600.

I have Openport 2.0 cable and I have remapped my car multiple times.
Stick with that if it's doing the job you want and use it to force the regen if it can. Don't buy extra tools you don't need! Info on Tactrix's website is limited but I get the impression it is more of a specialist reflash device with some logging capabilty. ECUTek you can also watch the parameters whilst you drive (well, you either drive OR watch the parameters...). It's "horses for courses." I bought the ECUTek to do a specific job, with support if necessary. It's done that job well and provided me some 'bonus' logging and data display too. ECUTek are a commercial company and have set up a commercial system so they want their 'pound of flesh' and a 'pound of flesh' for their dealers/tuners too. It's up to you whether you want to accept their system.

Apparently if you have a BRZ/86 or MX-5/Miata you can edit the ROMs for those vehicles yourself using ECUTek.

...is quite stiff plastic tube with outside diameter of 5mm.
Thanks, that just the number I need! 👍
 

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Discussion Starter #319
The oil level is high (above full mark) but I don't believe it's oil dilution- it doesn't smell of diesel and it's been that way since the last oil change. Anyone know of a way to remove ~500ml from the sump easily (suck it out with a thin tube down the dipstick pipe? ) without having to try the drain plug?
Well, 500ml nuthin'...I just removed 1.2l of oil and it's only just down to the full mark on the dipstick, and that's on a slight up slope.
 
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