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2010 2.0 X 5MT on LPG
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Discussion Starter #1
ok, so in stock tires i got bridgestone dueler 215/65/16. tyres are ok on dry and so-so on wet, but not that good on snow.

was thinking of either keeping one set of really good all year tyres or going with 2 sets(winter/summer) as i had on my prevoious 2wd car.

any recommendations on a good all year tyre in dimension 215/65/16 or 2 sets of summer winter(both tyre type and dimensions - i.e. 225/55/17 for summer and 205/70/16 winter).

so far i heard that geolanders (yokohama?) are good for all year round...
 

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2010 Forester X Premium
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ok, so in stock tires i got bridgestone dueler 215/65/16. tyres are ok on dry and so-so on wet, but not that good on snow.

was thinking of either keeping one set of really good all year tyres or going with 2 sets(winter/summer) as i had on my prevoious 2wd car.

any recommendations on a good all year tyre in dimension 215/65/16 or 2 sets of summer winter(both tyre type and dimensions - i.e. 225/55/17 for summer and 205/70/16 winter).

so far i heard that geolanders (yokohama?) are good for all year round...
I like the geos for all year tire. I drove in icey conditions, snow, etc and no problems. Good all year tires. I don't see a point in 2 set ups winter/summer unless you are in area that gets a true snow blizzards?
 

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2009 Forester
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Say no, in the snow, to the Geo...

I dunno... I live in Canada, only had my Forester for a couple months, and I'm not impressed at all with the Geolanders.

Its the first set I've ever had, and I can tell you that in snow or on ice, they dont even compare with a Perelli Scorpion or a Michelin X-Ice. (maybe not a fair compare, but hey...)

I was really hoping for better winter performance out of the Geo's so that I might actually be ablet ohave a car with only 1 set of tires for year-round, but alas, it seems it will not be the case.

I think the BEST EVER tire I've had that could be driven year round and perform without being noisy or rough was the Nokian WR. These things are fantastic. Unfortunately though, Nokian has figure dthis out and their prices have tripled since the last time I bought a set. I had these on a 2001 VW GOLF 1.8T, and they were awesome in the snow and great in the summer.
 

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2001 Forester S, auto
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471 Posts
Yeah I don't want to turn this into another Nokian WR G2 thread but that's the best and likely only option for a good all-season tire that doesn't suck in the winter.

I think certain models of the Geolandar are decent, but I would not consider the ones that Subaru specs as OEM tires to be one of the "decent" ones.

I'm not sure if there's a Nokian dealer in Croatia but I'd check out the WR G2 SUV tires.
 

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2016 Outback and WRX CVT
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I approach this in much the same vein as snajper69 - the '09's factory Geos aren't terrible for those who are well-seasoned in winter driving and are willing to be *really* conservative, but they do leave quite a bit to be desired.

The A/T variant, though, is supposed to be markedly better, by all reports (although it is likely that they will still pale in comparison to proper winter tires).

The thing that you'll need to play around with in your head, alokin, is that with a single "all-season" solution, while the more winter-oriented all-season tires can do remarkably well in wintry precip., the problem remains in that much of snow and slush traction is simply dependent on tread-depth, and a tire that you'll run year-round will see significant treadwear.

But as for the need for a winter tire?

I am afraid that, like many Americans, I am rather ignorant of the climates of other areas of the world. :redface: What are your winters like? how much freezing precipitation do you see? how are the roads (i.e. chemical treatments, plowing, etc., and how timely such clearing takes place)?

Those factors are the primary determinants of practicality.

But to start you off with at least some answers:

Typically, a "wider" tire will do better in the warmer seasons, allowing your vehicle to put down more rubber. You should counterbalance this with considerations for carcass weight (which can drastically affect performance) as well as practicality (ease of finding a particular size, expense, etc.).

In the winter, conversely, a "thinner" tire will be better, as it will help the vehicle's weight become more focused (think about the analogy between a snowshoe, which allows you to walk above the snow, versus walking on tiptoes through the snow - you'll want the smaller footprint on your car, to help it cut-through and dig-down to the pavement, rather than floating on top of the snow, as a wider tire would), and will "cut through" winter precipitation better.

Typically, you'll need at least a 20-mm difference in the tire's listed width (i.e. comparing between a 225-width to a 205-width) before you can really feel a real-world difference, street-driven.

So, how do you play around with tire sizing, in going from a wider to a thinner tire, while still keeping in-mind the necessary sizing to insure that your speedometer isn't off by too, too much?

Easy:

Tire size calculator

Here in the States, we call playing with such sizing "Plus/Minus-Sizing." TireRack's website does a great job at explaining this: Tire Tech Information - The Plus Concept

Hope this helps - and perhaps you can tell us a bit more about what your winters are like, and what kind of usage you're expecting/needing from your vehicle, during such months, so that we can all better tailor our advice. :smile:

---

BTW: I use an active LIDAR jammer that's invented by one of your countrymen!
 

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2010 2.0 X 5MT on LPG
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks.
Well, to be frank, I could survive with all yeart tyres but I would just
Be disappointed not to use foresters full awd potential. One issue would remain though,
Braking in snow with all terrain tyres is horrible, awd here does not help here
Climate here is continenta, hot summers (30C) and colder winters.

l
 

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2010 Forester Diesel
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62 Posts
Thanks.
Well, to be frank, I could survive with all yeart tyres but I would just
Be disappointed not to use foresters full awd potential. One issue would remain though,
Braking in snow with all terrain tyres is horrible, awd here does not help here
Climate here is continenta, hot summers (30C) and colder winters.

l
Hi Alokin
You definitely want two sets of wheels / tires – dedicated for summer vs winter conditions. Sure, you will "get by" on M+S tires, but if you look into the tests on stopping distance, it is obvious why a dedicated tire is the only way to go, if you drive with frost, ice or snow on the roads.

I am new to Subaru, but have a new diesel on 17" wheels. I chose Continental WinterContact 830 and think it is a fabulous tire. Quiet, good grip on ice, slush, snow – and the tests indicate that it is superb even on wet pavement. Check the recent Auto Motor Sport test.

Summer tire – I am not sure yet, whether I will use the Yokohamas that came on the car, or pick something else. Ultimately I would like a better tire, and a little taller than the 225/55, if it will fit.

M
 
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