Subaru Forester Owners Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
2016 2.5i Premium
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 2009 Forester 2.5X Premium (Manual Climate Control System) seems to have very low airflow out the windshield defrost vents and corner dash vents for the front side windows, when the Control dial is set to Defrost/Heat. This does not do a decent job of keeping the windshield fog free, when operating in this mode. I have to turn up the fan speed to the highest (4) to get just a barely noticable flow out to the windshield & windows. When I do set the fan speed to 4, I do get lots of air noise in the dash area but not much air on the windshield.

When the control is set to Defrost only, I get plenty of air on the windshield & windows. Likewise, when the control is set to Heat only, I get plenty of air coming out near the floor. I am wondering if I have a problem (something broken) with the airflow control in my dash, or is that typical of the 2009 Forester - Defrost/Heat Airflow?

- the bbdude
 

·
Registered
2010 Forester X Limited
Joined
·
57 Posts
Setting the control to defrost doesn't activate any fans. It routes air to the set control.

The car will normally route outside air into the cabin when you are driving. The faster you drive, the more air will naturally be pushed into the cabin.

Turning on the fan will force air into the cabin.
 

·
Registered
2016 2.5i Premium
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Chris,
Thanks. Yes I realize setting the control to Defrost is independent of the fan speed. I pretty much always have the fan speed set to at least 2. That setting (2) seems to to put out a reasonable amount of air onto the windshield when I'm set to Defrost or a reasonable amount of air onto the floor when I'm set to Heat, regardless of the car speed. However if I set the control to Defrost/Heat, still keeping the fan at 2, I get essentially no air flow onto the windshield.

With every other car I have ever owned, for typical winter driving, when starting the car cold, especially if it has been parked outside, you would expect to need to go to full defrost and probably max fan speed until the windshield is clear and the inside car temp has stabilized. After that you would expect to be able to reduce the fan speed to medium and change the mode to Defrost/Heat, to reduce fan noise and heat the car more evenly. Does the 2009 Forester not work that way or is mine broken?
- bbdude
 

·
Registered
2009 Forester (MT)
Joined
·
226 Posts
Maybe your Forester has a problem with the airflow control? I live in the interior of Alaska (very cold place), and mine works just fine. It has been parked outside for a few days, and I drive to work every morning. When I return home, I set the airflow control to defrost (not on maximum defrost position), the antifreeze temperature control to maximum, and the fan to the highest speed. Then I set the remote-start system, start it in the morning from inside the house with the remote starter, it runs around 18 minutes, and the windshield is clear when I get inside before I drive it (ambient temperature around -20 degrees F.).

Once I am driving to work, I set the airflow control to my chest and feet, leave the fan speed alone for about 10 minuets of driving, and then bring it down to 2 or three until I arrive to work 30 minutes later. Sometimes the hot air on my chest is just too hot, so I change the airflow control to the floor. No defrost air needed along the way.
------
Now, if you are bringing snow, or rain into the car (on your shoes, clothing, etc.) this moisture condensates when the cab gets warm, and the windshield (inside the car) will be covered with it. The same happens if for whatever reason the AC drain hose is depositing moisture inside the car, or there is an antifreeze leak that is getting inside the car. In this case you may have to set the airflow to defrost all over again, and the fan to maximum. If you park your car in the warm garage, to avoid building condensed moisture on the windows and windshield the next time, open a couple of windows while parked there through the night. As I get in my car with snow on my shoes, i drop the snow outside first. I do this by opening the door and seating while my legs are outside the car, I kick my boots against each other, then I pivot my body clockwise on the seat (getting my legs inside, of course :), and close the door.

If snowing and cold outside, there is a point where no matter how much air and heat you send to the windshield will prevent ice from building on the outer surface of the windshield. I often encounter this sort of condition every now and then regardless of which one of my automobiles I drive.
 

·
Registered
2016 2.5i Premium
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
OK Thanks Ray -- That's some good info. So when you have things stabilized and you are running in the Defrost/Heat mode with the fan speed set to 2, do you feel much air coming out of the long windshiled vent in the dash?
- bbdude
 

·
Registered
2009 Forester (MT)
Joined
·
226 Posts
OK Thanks Ray -- That's some good info. So when you have things stabilized and you are running in the Defrost/Heat mode with the fan speed set to 2, do you feel much air coming out of the long windshiled vent in the dash?
- bbdude
I haven't paid much attention to it. By ten minutes (or so) of driving at around 55 MPH, the heated air is just too hot on my face an chest, so I turn the fan to 2, and redirect the hot air to the floor.

When cold out and snowing, a lot of people prefer not to use defrost (not matter what automobile), because some of the snow melts just enough to create a layer of ice on the windshield.

One thing I have noticed is that the wipers sit a little too low on the windshield, so it takes a long time for the defrost to warm that portion of the windshield. Sometimes I forget to lift the wipers away from the windshield and leave them like that overnight, and when I am ready to drive in the morning they are stuck (frozen) on the windshield.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top