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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, I was replacing my front pads and rotors on my 09 forester, and wound up only doing pads since i had a caliper mounting bolt snap (that'll be fixed asap). my biggest issue though is that my brakes seem to be dragging now. I used the powerstop OE brake kit and followed the ChrisFix video. Is this normal? is there anything i should do? thanks.
 

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'14 Forester XT Touring
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340 Posts
Well it will all depend what is the culprit on your calipers.
It could be the guide pins, torn boot on the piston, or piston itself. Or just warp rotors.
You can diy rebuild your calipers, send them off to a brake shop, or buy new calipers.
If you go by the diy rebuild, the only hard part is using an air compressor to take the pistons out. I didn't have an air compressor, so that made it harder for me.
 

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2012 SH Manual Diesel
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416 Posts
my brakes seem to be dragging now.
Did you flush and/or bleed the brake fluid?

Did you service the brake calliper? i.e. overall clean (especially pad mounting surfaces), slide pins, piston seals, dust boots, fit new brake hardware....

Are these the original brakes? Or have they been serviced or replaced previously?
 

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2013 Forester X premium
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6 Posts
The pads skimming during driving is not unusual after a change, if they are only skimming the rotor on braking, you have an issue with the calipers.
 

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2015 Forester 2.5i Limited CVT
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827 Posts
Clean and lubricate the slide pins with a rubber safe lubricant. Subaru OEM Pads come with appropriate grease.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
i bled the brakes today, went for a drive and the front rotors that i replaced are way hotter than the rears that I didn't touch. I didnt grease guide pins or clean the caliper so i guess thats my plan for tomorrow.
 

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2012 SH Manual Diesel
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416 Posts
Lubricate slide pins with something like:
Permatex® Silicone Ceramic Extreme Brake Parts Lubricant

Product indicates that it is compatible with rubber components, and can also handle high temperatures. Ensure that no air or grease is trapped behind the pin, and that the pin can retract completely into the housing (should be able to feel it bottom out). If this doesn’t happen, it can prevent the calliper from returning to a neutral position (and the rear pad can remain contacting the rotor).

Don’t use regular red rubber grease, as it has a very low melting point. And don’t use petroleum based greases either, as it will likely effect the rubber components.

If your calliper piston seals are swollen, they can also prevent the piston from returning back into the bore (if this is the case, they will also be more difficult to remove). The swelling can be caused from using an incompatible lubricant. Brake fluid drying and crystallising, as well as corrosion can also cause the piston to become stuck.

I use IBS Brake Assembly Lubricant (may also work for Irritable Bowel too 😅). It appears that Centric, Willwood, and McKay’s, may also have a version. As you can see in the picture, it’s not a grease, not an oil, it’s not brake fluid etc. it’s a clear slippery viscose fluid. It also has a corrosion inhibitor.

When you compare the piston movement with a proper assembly fluid, you’ll see that it is better than using brake fluid, or no lube at all. And you can usually move the pistons in and out with your fingers.

If your pistons are stuck or hard to remove, you can get a piston removal tool, that expands and grabs the inside of the piston cup. If using compressed air, be very very careful, as they can come out with some velocity.

If you haven’t used compressed air to remove pistons before, don’t snooker yourself with a twin piston calliper. You have to blow them both out gradually (especially if one is really stuck). Place a piece of timber between pistons and calliper body, this stops them from popping right out (also protects the calliper body and piston from damage). Use varying thicknesses of timber to ease the pistons out a bit at a time. I place a rag over the top and hold it down (apart from the danger, a flying piston is likely to require a run to the parts store. Also absorbs the brake fluid).

Depending on what attachments you have for your compressed air, you can use a bolt to plug the banjo bolt hole, then remove the bleed nipple to blow air into the calliper.

If your pistons are corroding inside the cup, you can soak them in evaporust, or Fertan (Chemtech).
 

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2004 Forester XS 5MT
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792 Posts
Awesome!
One of the things I like about doing my own brakes (last did my Tundra last April) is that I can not only see whats going on but do something about it. After 2 days of disassemble and prep-lots of wire brushing etc) and some copper antisieze in the correct spots, along with new hardware, pins etc., it all went together perfect and only needed a slight ebrake adjustment. Dealer quoted $1200, Rockauto and extras ran me $395 and my labor, about 16 hours with lots of breaks cuz old man, LOL!
The spots where the ears of the pads slid in the caliper required alot of attention, and some removal of paint on the new pads, along with the proper lube to all slide freely.
Glad you got it sorted!
 

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2012 SH Manual Diesel
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416 Posts
The spots where the ears of the pads slid
For anyone contemplating a calliper rebuild (and have the extra time available), consider painting your callipers with something like, VHT High Temp Brake Calliper Paint (they boast good chemical resistance). I just used clear, so they ended up being the natural colour of the ‘clean’ calliper.

The painted surface is smoother, so the pads seem to move more freely (no lubrication used). It seems to collect a lot less brake dust, and any build up easily washes off with a squirt with the hose (no cleaning products used). I’ve also sprayed them with a few cleaning products (including a strong wheel cleaner), and they have so far stood up very well.

I did mine in winter time, and didn’t have an oven to bake them in (not the manufacturers recommended method). However, I used a propane torch to aid drying (in between coats), and for final curing; and it seems to have been successful (although it is clear. A coloured paint, would be easier to detect any flaws in the coating).

Also breathes a bit of life, back into an ageing car. 🙂
 

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2004 Forester XS 5MT
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792 Posts
"I just used clear, so they ended up being the natural colour of the ‘clean’ calliper. "

A great option for a DD!
 
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