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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So couple to few years ago got a 2009 forester 2.5x great shape maybe 69k miles on it? Within the first month changed front/rear dif, transmisison fluid (just a pan drop wth subau hp), and then the coolant... Researching the vehicles months before I purchased had me belive that 2009 was a transition year from green to long life blue. Every thread i read, every subaru person tells me a different story... In the end I changed to blue and did my best to clean the green out but figured it was time to drain/refill and then go from there.

now near 30k miles I want to tackle the fluids again and do plugs/wires. since near 90+k miles. Anyone with real knowldge on whether the blue is actually better and or has the conditioner pre-mixed? its 3x the price but if its really that much better cool, but if not buy the cheap green and the rebadged rad-weld coolant conditioner? so far no signs of headgasket leaks since the oil/filter change 1k miles ago but just still setting $ aside for timing belt and headgasket as the vehicle is amazing and worth fixing when the time comes.

Anyone with some insight on blue vs green? I feel I honestly researched and never got a clear answer.

Respectfully

new subaru owner
 

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2006 Subaru Forester xt 4at
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Higher temp rating, your 09 coolant should be blue in color which is a straight pour already mixed in and green is concentrated which has to be diluted with distilled water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So im aware the blue comes in pre-mix and the green you can buy as concentrate or mix but Im a diy mixer. I was just curious if the blue still requires the coolant additives since it appears the headgasket is still an issue until the 2012-2013 and up model engine types. I guess I was wondering if spending $20 plus a gallon on blue was worth it compared to $10 a gallon of green and $5 of coolant additive lol. Appears I could do two green changes for one blue change etc.
 

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2006 Subaru Forester xt 4at
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We still bill out conditioner at work for head gasket jobs and or timing cover jobs
 

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2008 LL Bean (4EAT)
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My Forester was built in June 2007. When time came for its first coolant change, I emailed Subaru which to use, and got a reply:
"Shortly after the production of your vehicle, Subaru began adding only the blue Genuine Subaru Long Life Coolant in our vehicles at factory. Going forward we are recommending that when adding, replacing, or servicing the cooling system, the blue Genuine Subaru Long Life Coolant should always be used, as we specially formulated this coolant for all Subaru vehicles.
Other types of coolants may not provide the proper protection to aid against corrosion of the cooling system.
So, in summary, your dealership should replace your coolant with the blue Genuine Subaru Long Life Coolant as opposed to the green coolant currently in your vehicle."

No mention of conditioner. However, in my case, I no longer have the original weak composite head gaskets that benefitted from the stop-leak conditioner. Since 2016, I have 6-Star MLS gaskets, the indy shop put them in with green coolant, no conditioner, and I just continue to use the green.
 

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Sahuarita, AZ 2018 Forester Limited
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I would use the blue Subaru coolant and the Subaru cooling system conditioner. I have done such for the life of my 2010 Forester and as of 244k miles the factory head gaskets have yet to leak.
 

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2015 Forester 2.5i Limited CVT
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I too would use the blue, which comes in both concentrated and pre mix. You can add blue to green but not green to blue. The blue lasts longer too. I stopped using the coolant conditioner. Not in my 2015.
 

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2017 Foz 2.5i CVT
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I bought my new '09 Forester in April, 2008 which I believe was the first month it was available in the US. It had blue coolant in it, so I have to believe that all '09 model Foresters had blue coolant from the factory.

Zerex and Peak make blue colored Asian car formulas; I have not researched content but they may be good if you are on a tight budget. I will admit to using a small quantity of Honda blue coolant, which I had a jug of in the garage, to top off my '09 Subaru while I had it.

My son now has the '09 and it's doing fine.
 

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2011 Subaru Forester
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I used Prestone blue for Asian vehicles. I think it was 11 bucks a gallon or so on sale at Wal-Mart. You can buy blue concentrate in the OEM brand at Canadian Tire that you mix 50=50 with distilled water. I am sure there are equivalents in the US. I did not bother with stop leak in my 2011 but it has a different engine and does not suffer the same head gasket issues
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would use the blue Subaru coolant and the Subaru cooling system conditioner. I have done such for the life of my 2010 Forester and as of 244k miles the factory head gaskets have yet to leak.
Thanks the info I was looking for.

I guess I could have explained more to everyone. I will be doing the service as though a subaru is a newer design engine that im not totally used to. I do work on diesels, gassers, and equipment so service/labor is not the issue. Just wanting to make sure I follow the advice of those with more ownership time/experience then me as thats probably the best resource. Did me well with all my other vehicles. Sometimes an egineer or manufacture has a great idea but it doesn't work in the long run etc.

I will proceed with continuing to use blue that i already changed into when I first got the car and then use the subau coolant conditioner. Appears its just rad-weld or is there an online/forum vendor to get ti from? The three subaru dealers within 150 miles of me do not sell it anymore. Amazon makes me nervous about such a unique bottle of juice.

Appears its like a gingeroot thing that wont cause issues with clogging like the old dexcool additive used to do? Also appears 1/2 a bottle like every 50-75k change the blue and re-add 1/2 bottle?
 

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2016 and 2020 Foresters
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which is not because of any incompatibility, but because adding green coolant to blue coolant will reduce the long life of the blue to the 30-month life of the green.
Which means that going to blue at this point doesn't make sense since it's not a virgin system. I've always read that once green is used in a system that originally held blue, you can't go back even if the system is flushed because you never get all of the coolant out.
 

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2008 LL Bean (4EAT)
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... once green is used in a system that originally held blue, you can't go back even if the system is flushed because you never get all of the coolant out.
That would be true for draining the radiator and block, which would still leave some residual green.
But I would think that a flushing with water pressure from a hose for long enough, would leave nothing but water in the system. Which you would then drain and replace with the blue coolant.
 

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That would then leave tap water in the system, which is also a no-no. Unless your hose is from a distilled water supply...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That would then leave tap water in the system, which is also a no-no. Unless your hose is from a distilled water supply...
You dont feel you're splitting hairs here? Unless you pay $$ to have a closed vac system (or the right friends) change the coolant you'll get 99% out with drain and refills. 2-3 with garden water and maybe 2 with distilled and you're going to be 99% fine. I have garden hose water in plenty of diesel and gas trucks/equipment that I just change the coolant at the right miles/hours and never had a coolant related issue. other than occasional water pump failure but at 30 yrs old and 250k-ish miles kind of to be expected.

I was mostly curious if the blue coolant was worth the 3x price and if it needed the coolant conditioner because the subaru is a new vehicle to me. I always work with gasser toyotas and diesel Dodge/Powerstroke and then the big Cat, Johns, Macks, Volvo etc.
 

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How is it splitting hairs?

Your question is whether to go with the blue coolant, or if it's 'better'. The answer in your situation, where it started out green and has unknown amounts of residual green, is no. Stick with the green because even if the blue may ostensibly be better in terms of preventing corrosion, in longevity, in preserving gaskets, it doesn't matter unless it's pure.

At least, that's the official stance that I recall. Milage may vary in what happens in the real world. Personally, given the EJ25's propensity for head gaskets to go bad, I wouldn't start changing the properties of the coolant and definitely wouldn't introduce tap water. Just my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
(I realize now my first post didn't explicitly say that sorry) but I already switched to blue the first month of ownership since im a new owner and everyone said I should use blue because the green requires the additive and needs to be changed more often. So I flushed the crap out of the system probably 4+ drain and refills with tap water over a week and then 2-3 with distilled to make sure I got as close as I could to getting tap water and green out. Did my best to get a 50/50 mix of the blue and figured im nearing 30k miles time to do the front/rear dif and trans again. Then thought well maybe its time for the coolant since the 09s are a huge debate with people. 50% claim is came with green the other blue and 3 dealers gave me 3 different answers lol. Im only remotely this OCD since my wife drives the car and shes not super mechanically inclined. I have a history of shops breaking things and messing up so while im still young enough I work on my vehicles unless its like the headgaskets or full on rebuilds. I've been down that road and sometimes you spend more for DIY then a skilled shop with all the proper tools.

But none of the 3 dealers id be willing to drive too sell the conditioner and they weren't as knowledgeable as folks on some of these forums are with their experience. So figured id ask. But even amongst the suby fans its debated lol. Kind of like whether seafoam actually does anything. Diehards for and against haha.

appreciate your input @sneefy
 

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That would then leave tap water in the system, which is also a no-no. Unless your hose is from a distilled water supply...
When you drain coolant from the block and the radiator, some wetness is left on the water passage surfaces. After a hose flushing and draining, that wetness would be tap water. Is that small amount what you are concerned about?
 

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... Stick with the green because even if the blue may ostensibly be better in terms of preventing corrosion, in longevity, in preserving gaskets, it doesn't matter unless it's pure...
The blue, being not mixed with 50% water, is better than green in preventing corrosion. But the purity of neither one "preserves" gaskets. The gaskets are "preserved" by the intrusion of stop-leak sealing compound into their leaking surfaces.
Subaru Conditioner (Holts Rad-Weld) has gritty particles that liquify and circulate in hot coolant. When they intrude into a leaking head gasket surface, they interfere with the leak.
 

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... Anyone with real knowldge on whether the blue is actually better and or has the conditioner pre-mixed? its 3x the price but if its really that much better cool, but if not buy the cheap green and the rebadged rad-weld coolant conditioner? ...
Subaru says to add conditioner to blue as well as green (that was for the EJ25), as the color of the coolant has nothing to do with head gasket sealing:

553778
 
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