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2008 STI
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1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I have a 2008 STI and am prepping it for Rally Cross. I came here because there is a plethora of knowledge regarding swapping suspension parts.

My question is a little different than that of most STI owners as the majority seems to be going for the lowered, tarmac type of setup and I am looking to lift the vehicle for off-road.

My question is this: Can I install the strut/spring combination from a Forester to my 2008 STI to raise the vehicle and improve suspension travel?

This is new territory for me as I have, until now, focused on lowering/stiffening vehicles for on-road setups, (we have an Evo for tarmac), and it is difficult to find information for going the other way.

-Nathan
 

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09 FXT Stage 2 4EAT
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431 Posts
Hey there,
My only guess is that you would have to find a 09-10 Forester suspension set-up if you were going to try this. I've put 08-09 STi springs on my 09 Forester and they fit directly. As for struts, I don't why they wouldn't fit but it's something that you should compare when you get a chance. The only thing that I can think of that might hang you up is the bolt pattern difference but I'm just thinking out loud. The other difference is that your struts are inverted inserts and our are not. If you were in my area I would let you come by and do some detective work. If any one else knows better than me please correct me.
 

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NA No more! :(
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8,529 Posts
^are you the raptr that used to own the vader mobile?

i would also assume that the 5x100 and 5x114 difference will mean at least rear strut incompatibility, as it has for us in the previous generation.

could you do something similar to a jackson rally lift if you can find someone to custom fab spacers and use longer bolts?
 

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Registered
2002 Forester
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428 Posts
The problem is that it's a newer gen chassis, and the suspension changed on it. I'm not sure what's available for it.

A good start is to first understand your suspension. Start measuring fender to wheel center heights. Measure static, full extension, and full compress. Lift up one corner. Understand what range you're working with front and rear.

From here, determine how much bump and rebound travel you have available. A broadly capable setup will sit somewhere in the middle of its stroke range at rest and offer several inches of travel in both directions to handle uneven surfaces. This makes for a much more stable car. I would think that stock should be good in this regard, but maybe it isn't as good as it could be.

Other things to think about...

Sway bars resist independent suspension travel by linking left and right together. Smaller bars equals more compliance. You can actually raise spring rates to the game same effective roll resistance and end up with a more independent and compliant suspension setup. I wouldn't think stock is terribly bad. I wouldn't think Subaru would use all that big a bar on their stock cars, even a STI.

Despite being off-road, stiffer springs equals a more responsive and subsequently faster car. You'll be surprised how stiff you can actually run without really upsetting the car. A stock STI (older) is 250 lb/in front and 200 lb/in rear (roughly). This is a good starting point for a sport setup. It's great for a broad mix of use for onroad daily use, to rally-x, and auto-x. It's not terribly out of place anywhere. You can go stiffer without a problem. It starts to get less nice for daily use though but gets more competent with sport use. For example, I'm at 350 lb/in front and 250 lb/in rear on my Forester, and it still isn't too stiff for rally-x use. It actually feels relatively mild when pushed hard. It also is up 2" from where a stock Impreza would be, so I've got plenty of bump travel over the bumps and ruts. I find adequate suspension travel to be the bigger factor in compliance then simply spring rate.

So, what's available for the new gen Impreza chassis? Frankly, I haven't the faintest clue. Unfortunately, you're stuck researching that stuff yourself. I think you're pretty much stuck with $2000 plus coilovers. All you really have available is lowering springs for the stock struts...and then coilovers for $2000, $3000, or whatever. So...you probably stay stock.

I think in the end what you should do is nothing. Buy a set of good tires for off-road use. Suggestion, the Blizzak LM-25 has been surprisingly good for me. It's a surprisingly good broad use tire, doesn't work bad on asphalt, gravel, dirt, snow, or ice. The carcass is performance oriented, so it's not mushy despite being a winter tire. The tire has good grip and is pretty much equal in all directions.

Good tires, stock car, and just learn to drive the car really good.
 
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