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2006 Forester X
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Discussion Starter #1
2006 2.5L non turbo.

Timing is jumped. Do people generally replace the entire engine or can you get away with just the heads? What is best? I am new to subies.
 

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2001 Forester
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How are the head gaskets? If the are leaking, the process of pulling off the heads to replace the gaskets would give you the opportunity to see if there was damage due to the timing belt.

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2006 Forester X
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Discussion Starter #3
thats great ! thanks for the info.

was told by a subaru specialist shop that normally at worst its heads only. Bottom end should be fine. Does this match with your knowledge?
 

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2001 Forester
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That would be correct, at best damaged or bent valves, at worse tops of piston damaged.

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2006 Forester X
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Discussion Starter #6
apparently, according to the shop, when people bend valves a lot of folks just replace the head making used heads hard to find. Makes no sense to spend more money when a value repair is all thats needed.
 

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2003 Forester
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You can get a set of rebuilt heads on Ebay for $600. I got one from a well rated vendor for a Honda D17 and it's still running great 4 years and 60k miles later.
 

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2004 FXT 4EAT
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I had a timing belt snap on me at highway speed (still facepalming over the fact that I never checked the belt).
I replaced all the valves myself (there were 2 that were not bent, but I figured I might as well do them all). Wasn't that hard to do, really...
And I didn't pull the engine...

But if you're not doing the repair yourself, it CAN get expensive to have all the valves replaced by a shop. (since it didn't overheat, it's possible the head surfaces won't need machining)
 

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2003 Forester XS 150k
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2006 2.5L non turbo.

Timing is jumped. Do people generally replace the entire engine or can you get away with just the heads? What is best? I am new to subies.
Depends on how far it jumped. I just done my 03 2.5 non turbo and did not have all teeth seated. My timing jumped one tooth on both cams. Took everything apart and put back together right. Double checked by rotating the engine to verify timing. All is good and back down the road.
 

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MY05 Forester 2.5 XT 5MT
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How much did the belt jump by? If it's 1 tooth or so, it isn't necessarily game over. If it jumped say 10 teeth or the belt snapped, then that's a bit different........

There are borescopes out there that you can feed a camera down the sparkplug hole to look over the valves while keeping the head on the engine. There's even cheap versions that connect to your phone and use that as the display for the camera
 

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2003 Forester
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Set the engine to TDC and do a compression check. That will tell you if you bent valves.
 

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2004 FXT 4EAT
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Set the engine to TDC and do a compression check. That will tell you if you bent valves.
No need to set it to TDC for a compression check/test. Unless you're thinking of a leakdown test...

Either will tell you something about leaking valves..
 

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There are borescopes out there that you can feed a camera down the sparkplug hole to look over the valves while keeping the head on the engine. There's even cheap versions that connect to your phone and use that as the display for the camera
+1 on this recommendation.

I had an incident a few years back with my Challenger where a ground electrode had fallen off of one of my spark plugs. Unsure of what damage it may have caused inside the cylinder and the fact that my cheap borescope wouldn't fit in the spark plug hole, I bought another that hooks up to your phone, tablet, computer, etc.

Now, mine wasn't cheap @ close to $400, but it worked beautifully. The tip also bends up to 180 facing right back at you via a rod that you press on the handle which is spring loaded and also has a nut that can be tightened to hold the camera at whatever position you stop at. It also has an array of really bright LEDs surrounding the tiny camera in the tip that can be adjusted to the brightness you need.

I was able to record video of the inspection and review it again. I determined the piece hadn't done any visible damage inside the cylinder, to the piston face nor the valves and must have passed through the exhaust. Worst case scenario I suppose is that it's stuck in the catalytic converter and could be causing a hot spot.

Anyhow, the tool has proved to be quite valuable to me for a number of tasks I used it for since where it saved me from disassembly, to get into tight spaces, etc. ......even around the house to peek into walls, etc.

To me, it was worth the cost to be able check inside the cylinders vs. having taking to car to someone else to inspect or performing repairs that obviously weren't required.

Not that I expect anyone to buy the one I did, but here is what it looks like.

544365


When I was shopping for borescopes, I fell into some discussions with aircraft mechanics who happen to use these quite often to inspect the inside of the engines they work on. This one was recommended by one of those mechanics and I've been quite happy with it. I'm sure there are others that are just as good or better while perhaps even being a little cheaper.

Here are a couple pics from their site of pictures taken with the device:

544366
544367
 

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HMmm ! Another Airplane related experience .... ! Those folks can teach all of us a lot of worthwhile facts ... about engine longevity ... as their Engines are the number one beginning , end ... and pretty much everything in-between when it comes to vehicle safety AND performance. The concept of "Good-Enough" is never ever allowed to even come near a hanger, runway, or even any conversation !!!!!
 

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2006 Forester X
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Discussion Starter #15
thank you soooo much for all of the replies.

Well I bought it the car: 2006 Forester 2.5X with 143K miles on it.

Is it possible the timing can be jumped without the belt breaking?

Getting it looked at soon.

I will have other questions soon I am sure,.

Great site.
 

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1998 forester
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11 Posts
another question.
View attachment 544481



Does this mean built june 2005? seems like it based on my reading.
Yep, June of 2005.
I bought a 2006 Impreza sedan with a broken timing belt. It had bent most of it's exhaust valves. I spent about $1000 on parts and machine shop services alone, and 15 or so hours rebuilding it myself, refreshing all seals, gaskets, belts, rollers, tensioner, water pump, fluids and hoses. That equates to over $2500 retail cost. I hoped to get 100k more miles out of it to make it worthwhile, but it was totaled after only about 60k miles.That works out to a years worth of car payments, and depending on the condition of your car, may well be worth the cost.
You should have a leak down test done to find out the condition of valves, after reinstalling or replacing the belt, and any failed timing components. What caused the belt to jump may cost several hundred dollars even if no valves were damaged.
 

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2006 Forester X
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Discussion Starter #18
Yep, June of 2005.
I bought a 2006 Impreza sedan with a broken timing belt. It had bent most of it's exhaust valves. I spent about $1000 on parts and machine shop services alone, and 15 or so hours rebuilding it myself, refreshing all seals, gaskets, belts, rollers, tensioner, water pump, fluids and hoses. That equates to over $2500 retail cost. I hoped to get 100k more miles out of it to make it worthwhile, but it was totaled after only about 60k miles.That works out to a years worth of car payments, and depending on the condition of your car, may well be worth the cost.
You should have a leak down test done to find out the condition of valves, after reinstalling or replacing the belt, and any failed timing components. What caused the belt to jump may cost several hundred dollars even if no valves were damaged.
thanks HMM.

I am hoping its just a few hundred.
you caught me mid edit.

I posted my date question in the body section.

This is a US car, I bought from someone visiting Canada. I need to have it imported, but because of the manufacturer date I will get out of some of the taxes lol.
 

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2014 Forester Touring 2.5 CVT
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I had a timing belt snap on me at highway speed (still facepalming over the fact that I never checked the belt).
I replaced all the valves myself (there were 2 that were not bent, but I figured I might as well do them all). Wasn't that hard to do, really...
And I didn't pull the engine...

But if you're not doing the repair yourself, it CAN get expensive to have all the valves replaced by a shop. (since it didn't overheat, it's possible the head surfaces won't need machining)
How in the world did you pull the heads w/o pulling the engine? Just changing spark plugs is a feat of super dexterity for me.
 

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How in the world did you pull the heads w/o pulling the engine? Just changing spark plugs is a feat of super dexterity for me.
Bet he pulled the "fender-walls" !!! May-be even some of the Front-Suspension !!! That is definitely easier than pulling the entire drive-train !!!!
 
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