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2004 Forester
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Discussion Starter #1
I need to replace the clutch on my 04 Forester and I figured I’d replace the flywheel with a lightweight one while I have the engine out. I’m looking for recommendations on what brand/style to get.
 

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@mknechtel For a street driven car , I usually recommend sticking with the heaviest “lightweight” flywheel you can find. The ACT chromoly is usually heavier than the Exedy stuff and is steel vs aluminum.

As far as the clutch side, I typically stick with Exedy clutch kits, as Exedy is the OEM supplier to Subaru. But South Bend is known for a good kit also. ACT and Comp are probably decent as well but no experience with them personally
 

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2001 Forester L Automatic
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You will lose some torque with a lightened flywheel which may or may not be in your favor depending on how you like to drive.

When I worked in in an automotive machine shop back in the early 90’s, some of the customers would ask that we increase the step between the surfaces on their flywheels because it gave a better feel to the clutch.... but I just don’t remember exactly how they described it!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
@mknechtel For a street driven car , I usually recommend sticking with the heaviest “lightweight” flywheel you can find. The ACT chromoly is usually heavier than the Exedy stuff and is steel vs aluminum.

As far as the clutch side, I typically stick with Exedy clutch kits, as Exedy is the OEM supplier to Subaru. But South Bend is known for a good kit also. ACT and Comp are probably decent as well but no experience with them personally
I was eyeing the Exedy flywheel and clutch already so I’ll probably go with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You will lose some torque with a lightened flywheel which may or may not be in your favor depending on how you like to drive.

When I worked in in an automotive machine shop back in the early 90’s, some of the customers would ask that we increase the step between the surfaces on their flywheels because it gave a better feel to the clutch.... but I just don’t remember exactly how they described it!
I’ve owned a 02 RS with lightweight flywheel on it and I liked it a lot better than stock.
Also could you explain what increasing the step between surfaces does? I’m curious how that changes how the clutch feels.
 

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I’ll reach out to a buddy of mine who had me increase the step on his flywheel. Usually hear from each other a couple times a mont. Will also see if I can find anything online.
 

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I was eyeing the Exedy flywheel and clutch already so I’ll probably go with them.
The Exedy clutches are great, but their flywheels are too light and usually all aluminum if I remember correctly. I’d look for something a bit heavier and all chromoly.

By machining in a larger step, you also increase the risk of throwing off the clutch release and engagement point. Might “feel better” but I’d run them how they come
 

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I’ll reach out to a buddy of mine who had me increase the step on his flywheel. Usually hear from each other a couple times a mont. Will also see if I can find anything online.
Reached out to my buddy to see if he remembered exactly what I did and he wasn’t sure if in increased or decreased the step. Also looked on the internet and only found one page saying increasing caused a mushy feel.
 

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2004 Forester
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Discussion Starter #9
I ended purchasing the Exedy organic clutch and their chromoly lightweight flywheel (12.9lb).

Thanks everyone for the help.

I’m a bit new to these forums, how do I close this thread?
 
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