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2002 Forester
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

2001 Subaru Forester
Photos below

I found the leak in the rear steel brake line. It's right near a fitting that sits right in front of the passenger side rear wheel.

The line that's leaking goes toward the rear over the wheel arch in the frame, and is the upper of the two lines going to the rear wheels.

The problem is that they both disappear behind the gas tank, so I can't figure out which wheel the upper one is going to.

I also can't figure out how to replace it if I can't even see where it goes!

I'm thinking that I'll get a new brake line and route it as best I can, without trying to follow the original path.

So, any advice on how to replace it?

Is there some way to follow the original path, or should I just find a way to get it there?

What is the fitting that it goes into? Is it the proportioning valve?

And, yes, I know I should replace both lines! My goal for today is replacing the one with the leak, but I'll probably try to do both.

I'm just trying to get another 6 months out of this Forester. I bought it new, but it needs rear struts, windshield, timing belt, new front fenders and bumper covers, and probably other things that I can't think of right now...

Thanks!





 

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05MY Second SG6 4EAT > JDM 5MT
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i'd clean it real good and wrap a napkin around it to get a better idea which the leak is coming from if not all for connection points.

(Sent from my LG G2 via AutoGuide App)
 

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MY09 XSn 2.0 Diesel 6MT
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If you intend to keep your Forester then it's going to be a full set of brake lines.

The pics you've posted show lots of corrosion, and once you start to disturb one line/joint the rest will need replacing.
 

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2002 Forester
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for your replies!

i'd clean it real good and wrap a napkin around it to get a better idea which the leak is coming from if not all for connection points.
I found that the one that's lower on this fitting had a split in it, so it needs replacement.

Of course, as I try to remove the bad one, the fitting, bracket, and other lines are also moving, so I'll need to replace them both.

If you intend to keep your Forester then it's going to be a full set of brake lines.
I'm not sure what is meant by "full set", but I don't see a need to replace the front lines at this point, only the rear.

The question remains, how to replace them?

I'm really hoping I don't have to run new lines all the way up under the hood.

The lines going to the front go through a grommet to under the back seat and the lines under the seat are as good as new.

Can I cut the lines there and use some sort of fitting to join in a new length of line? I don't have a flaring tool, so I was hoping there was some sort of compression fitting that would work.

I know in the past I've gotten two different opinions on compression fittings on brake lines-- "Don't do it" and "It's OK to use" so I don't want to start a big debate here!

But if I do need to run a new line all the way to the front, what path does it follow? Is there an illustration, diagram, or photos of how it's done?

Ideally I could cut both lines under the back seat, splice in new lines, and run them to the wheels.

I'm thinking that it would be easier to run the driver's side line across the back seat, under the reinforcement bar that's there, punch a hole, and run the new line down through a new grommet to the driver's side wheel.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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MY09 XSn 2.0 Diesel 6MT
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966 Posts
Once you 'repair' that leak, the brake pressure will return to normal. That is until the next section of your dangerously corroded brake lines fail. Hence my statement that you'll need a full set of exposed/corroded lines once you start.

As for compression joints, I've only ever used OE/pattern lines or had them made up, but all use 'flared' joints. If you can get the use of a 'flaring' tool then it's possible to splice into "as new" pipe.

As for the exact route for your new brake lines, whatever is easy & safe for yourself. That clamp/joint you show only looks like clamp, not a splitter/bias bar.


Mike.
 

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2014 Forester 2.5i 6 spd
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433 Posts
Splicing new lines in is possible, but steel brakelines require a two step flaring process that uses specialized tooling. Compression fittings should not be used!

Now then, Advanced Auto Parts and some of their competitors either lend or rent specialized tools. You'll need the brake lines anyway, plus a female connector for each line. Check with them about the tools.
 

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1998 forester s auto
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27 Posts
Same problem as yours. Here's what I did. Removed the rear seat and cut the 2 lines just before they exit the vehicle so as to get maximum tube to splice to. I bought new lines after i decided how to run them. I used 2 for the drivers side and one for the pass. side. i ran them like this. For the r/r wheel I just went back through the grommet and straight back to the hose. I doesn't require any serious bending and they will tuck up neatly to the arch. For the drivers side I ran one across the seat pan under the brace that bolts in.You'll notice there is a wire(for the abs) that feeds through a grommet. The new brake line will fit through that hole if you lift the grommet up. I ran a separate line from there to the rear hose on that side. So there is a fitting just before the line exits the vehicle.What i did to prevent chafing of the line is take a piece of rubber tubing ,slit it down the middle and wrap the brakeline in it. A piece maybe 3" long. Did the same thing for the abs wire.Again none of these required any serious bending. The only flaring I had to do was where the new lines connected to the old all the rest were on the new lines.(Glad I used to do plumbing) Simply tighten them down. I did have a problem initially with one caliper still hanging up but after bleeding it it's resolved. All told maybe $30.00 and a couple hours time.And no new holes! Unfortunately I'm not smart enough to post pics or I would.:icon_redface: Hope this helps
 

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2001 Forester L Autotragic
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Sorry to bump an old thread. Mine blew out in the same place today sadly. All my rear lines are very bad so I will be replacing them. I considered using oem replacement lines. But I now feel that it can be made better as the above Dennyo has done. Removing that goofy union above the trailing arm will be better imo as its less to corrode. Moving the union under the seat leaves less items in the elements to corrode.

Now to see how much brake line I have in the parts department :)

Love forums like this!!!
 

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2014 328i xDrive Wagon 8 spd Auto
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I just came across this thread. I know for sure that Subaru is aware of a problem with corrosion on that fitting, because the 08 OBW's had a recall for that very problem. It affected cars sold in the snow belt. Not sure what models and years were affected, but might be worth looking.
 

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2001 Forester S Auto
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Hi All,

I too am going to embark on the challenge of replacing the leaking lines in the the "exact spot" as pictured. If someone could let me know the diameter of the steel tubing required that would be great. The lines inside the car are fine. I want to splice under the seat and run it to the flex hose connector. I was thinking a female connector and flange the inside line and connecting it using two males has anyone done this? Any help would be appreciated.
 

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If you have a subie and the brake lines are leaking, its 99% chance the its at the junction under the rear passenger seat where the lines go thru the floor. Not too bad to fix if your slightly handy. Unbolt rear seat and remove. By the doorsill, you will see the 2 lines that turn towards the middle and goes through a grommet into the floor. Cut the lines there leaving a staight sectionof at least an inch or more, close to the grommet.rip out the rusty lines that go thru the grommet. Go on ebay and order 25ft of 3/16 nickel copper brake line that has metric fittings and find a brake line union in 3/16. You might need to sand the outer tube diameter a tiny bit if you use a compression fitting (not recommended) get a double flare tool (harbor freight ) put connector on tube then flare. Run nickel copper line fromrubber brake hose to and thru grommet put in connector and flare. Connect. Then roughly run line to where it connects to rubber line ( leave attacted to bracket to hold it for you) cut off old line right at connector, spray with WD40 OR EQUIVALENT, do what you need to to get old connector out ( a little heat helps) bend new line up to the hose connection keeping a 1 inch straight section at the connector and cut with tubing cutter, put on appropriate connector end (test fit it first to make sure threads match) flare connect...

For the other side run new line across car under rear seat along support bar drill a hole in the gas line grommet in the unused hole that you see there run line thru there to rubber hose connector repeat just like other side. Once they are all connected push the lines upalong frame out of the way and out of the way of the drive axle when the suspension compresses. Bleed brakes and your done!
 

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Hello, I have a 2001 Forester with the same issue, exact same spot is leaking, I pulled the back seat and I have 3 lines coming from the front and going through the grommet. I also measured the brake tubing and it is 5/16 outer diameter, any ideas on why ther is 3 lines and a thick brake tubing?
 

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I looked closer, and these (3 tubes) were the fuel lines, the brake lines (2) are on the other side (passenger side, under a piece of black tape and they are 3/16 tubing, so I answered my own question. I will attempt repairs shortly.
 

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Well we did two unions under the seat using NiCopp 3/16 tubing, out the rubber grommet. The brass connection block was removed and the tubing ran down the side of the frame, to the passenger connection, the short line to the hub was replaced as well as both wheel cylinders (as they were frozen). The second line followed the first line and ran across to the drivers side an the short tubing line and wheel cylinders was replaced. The two new lines were then tie wrapped to the frame with chafing protection. This beats dropping the fuel tank and works well. Good luck to anyone doing this repair, it took about 5 1/2 hours on a lift, but looks very neat and tidy as the tubing was bent to follow the contours.
 
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