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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday I replaced my rotors, pads, calipers, master cylinder and brake booster on my 2001 forester and today I bled the brakes 3 times total but no matter how much I did the brakes are still not working and the pedal goes to the floor. could this be a brake booster adjustment problem or do I just need to keep bleeding them?
 

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2001 Forester
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Doubtful brake booster has anything to do with this, it's main purpose is to provide a vacuum environment to "assist" you pushing against the hydraulic fluid. I would keep bleeding. How much fluid have you bled already? Have you tried pumping up the pedal to build up some pressure? Does it still sink after pumping up the pedal? Did you adjust proper pedal free-play?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I've gone through about a gallon of fluid and I pump 3 times before cracking the bleeder screw. how do you adjust the free play?
 

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2001 Forester
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Measure distance pedal travels before actually engaging the master cylinder. There are there is a threaded shaft attached to the brake pedal, the shaft goes through the firewall on the way to the master cylinder. Loosen the adjusting nut and then turn the shaft in either direction depending on how much or how little free-play you want. At one point on my 2001, I felt the pedal travelled too much ie almost part way to the floor. So I went and measured the free play and found I was about 2mm too much free play. So it does not take a lot to get just the right feel.

Specifications are 1-3mm of free play.
 

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2012 Forester X Auto
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With everything you replaced, it is unlikely that you can evacuate the air from the system just by using the pedal.
You need a vacuum pump. They are cheap at Harbor Freight..
 

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2015 Forester 2.5i Limited CVT
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There is a procedure to bleeding the master cylinder. Do you have the FSM?
Did you use all OEM parts? Subaru has issued superseded parts. Iirc, there’s a TSB on the brake booster, maybe others.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
it is the same as the old one
I dont have a manual but yes they're all oem parts
I'll pick up a vacuum pump and try that instead
 

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2012 SH Manual Diesel
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Are you using a hose and bottle on the bleeder? Have you got it hanging higher than the caliper? (Or at least, a good section of hose coming off the bleeder, that is higher).

Did you put any Teflon tape around the bleeder threads?
 

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2012 Forester X Auto
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Bleeding works great to get a bit of air bubbles out of a line, but using the master cylinder to pump a system filled with air is another story.
A vacuum works a lot better whenever major components are replaced, unless you want to spend the rest of your life bleeding the system.
 

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I’m new to Subaru, just read a post on a Honda where the caliper was installed on the wrong side with the bleed valve at the bottom of the caliper. Make sure the bleed valve is located at the top.
 

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Something is seriously wrong if manual bleed doesn’t work, esp 3 times. Are you still observing bubbles with each pedal stroke?
 

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2011 Forester 2.5X Automatic
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First off you need to get a manual ...or at least the chapter on brakes and the anti-lock system.

You replace a master cylinder you must bench bleed the new master cylinder. If you don't know this then you really have no business screwing with your brakes ...and without an FSM? Dude that's a recipe for disaster ...ignorance will be anything but "bliss" when you can't stop.

Alright, you need to start from the beginning; you need to bench bleed the MC. You need to read up on the brake booster pin and how long it needs to be. Does your car have anti-lock brakes? ...I'll bet it does ...hell my '98 GMC pickup has 4-wheel anti-lock brakes ...I'm bettin' your '01 Foz has them too. If you replaced the MC and didn't bench bleed it then there's a good probability you got air in the brake valve control module ...the anti-lock brakes ...and you'll need to get the air out of it next. Some brake modules are easy to bleed ...some just get bled using the normal brake bleed process. But others are more complicated and have procedures to follow to bleed the valve assembly. My '98 GMC is like that ...I need a scan tool that can connect to the ABS system and trigger the ABS valves in the unit. Only place you're gonna find out this info for sure is the FSM. You can score them as .pdf's for not a lot of coin and just print what you need ...but the most important thing you'll get out of a copy of the FSM is knowledge.

Bleed in this order:
Master cylinder
ABS brake control module
Normal brake bleeding

The FSM will tell you any specific procedures for thoroughly and correctly bleeding your brakes.

Vacuum bleeders suck ...literally and figuratively. And the ones Harbor Freight sells are nothing but a POS ...I know, I just bought one. A way much better and easier method is pressure bleeding. Motive Products makes a nice kit for about $70 or so. I know, I have one of them. Check them out ...you'll need the basic kit with the adapter to fit the Subaru brake fluid reservoir. With a pressure bleeder, bleeding the brakes and flushing the system is cake ...a true one man operation.

Time to take a breath, crack a beer, relax and do some homework ...get the proverbial ducks in a row ...and hit it again from the beginning.
 
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