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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Car is a 99 Forester 2.5 liter 4 cylinder and automatic transmission. I was driving back from Washington to Portland & the car started to misfire heavy CEL flashing. Then by the the time I pulled over the car kinda kicked back into gear & the light stopped flashing. Car ran as usual on the drive back & didn’t experience anything like that again until this week and it was the same thing. Pulled over car jumped back into gear and drove normal. It it just my coils/spark plugs that need replaced, a brain fart in the system???? I’ve asked my car friends and they have no idea either.
 

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Edit: Not sure what "Heavy Cell Flashing" means. Do you mean: my dash board lit up like a Christmas tree? Is your battery solidly connected with clean terminals, ground, etc?

Amazon has several cheap but capable bluetooth OBD2 readers that talk to a free app called Torque. Buy one, do a scan and report back what it tells you. Without it, we'd just be guessing (like I just did in my edit^ :) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Meant the misfire itself was rough/heavy haha. Appreciate ur response I’ll look into getting one of those scanners!
 

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@Remco used the scanner on it tonight & no codes were in the system. Do u think its likely something to do with the battery like u said in your previous edit?
 

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@Remco used the scanner on it tonight & no codes were in the system. Do u think its likely something to do with the battery like u said in your previous edit?
That is a distinct possibility.
If it truly misfired, it would store a code. It may not throw a CEL but under "Pending Codes" you'ld see that misfire. Some scanners give you insight into misfire counts, which is useful.
I'd check the battery terminals, clean them with a solution of baking soda and water. Get one of those battery terminal cleaning tools equipped with steel brushes and clean the cable ends. Also check the other sides of those cables, especially the ground.
Edit: make sure the battery terminals are tight and you can't move them at all, after they've been secured.

If you have a multimeter (harbor fright has cheap ones), perhaps rig one into the cigarette lighter so you can see what's going on when/if the problem occurs again. You could run around with that OBD2 scanner plugged in and monitor a basic like battery voltage on your phone. If power is indeed the problem, you lose OBD2 comm. That in itself could be an indicator of something so is worth while.
 
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