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2015 Forester i Premium
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello everyone. To get the question out of the way first: Is there a way to remove some gear oil from the transmission easily? If not, will extra damage the engine?

I thought I might be able to siphon some out of the dipstick (didn't work) and didn't know if releasing some from the drain would compromise the seal of the bolt (which could lead to it coming out on the road)

Ok, here we go.
All parts and fluids are OEM from the local (hour away) dealership
List of things done:
4 rotors
4 hps 5.0 pads
Manual transmission change
Rear differential change
Coolant flush
Brake fluid flush
Oil change
Serpentine belt change
Fog light installation

Thing not done:
Spark plug replacement with Bosch double iridium plugs



First, if you have the MT model, change that gear oil. I'm not sure if mine was ever changed and it looked horrible. The rear differential wasn't that bad, but the transmission was close to black.

Replacing the rotors and pads were almost simple. We've all seen videos on how to do this and nothing was complicated it difficult, but the lesson learned was doing this in a garage in 19° weather can lead to a broken bolt on the caliper bracket. Doing this can lead to the wrong part being ordered and the new part being received 4 days after you thought you'd be done.

With a good quality T70, the transmission change was a breeze. The rear differential plugs didn't want to come out. With a day of penetration fluid on it and a torch to warm things up, it became just as easy as the front.
I used the quart pump you can get from Amazon and it worked great.
When it came to filing the transmission, and going back to the cold, the gear oil was very thick which lead to some major spillage. I cleaned it up best I can and warmed up the bottles. We were using the dipstick hole to fill it. After filling it, we noticed that the gear oil is past the full line. It's not up to the rounded part of the stick, but close.
The coolant flush was almost easy but we couldn't find the o ring the service manual says to replace. none of the local dealerships had those in stock, which makes me believe they never even changed the o rings. After filling the radiator with distilled water and draining it again, the o-ring was on the bolt. After inspection, it was deemed to be in good condition. Only big lesson was to really shake the conditioner, it has some solids that I tried to get to be as small as possible.

The brake fluid flush was done easily with the vacuum pump you can get in Amazon. As long as you follow the videos, everything will work out. The only trouble I ran in to was getting the clutch line to flush. You have to remove the air intake to get to the bleeder valve. I followed the recommended pattern and everything was a breeze.

The oil change was done because my fumoto valve started leaking and I was losing to much oil.

The serpentine belt was the easiest thing we did. Having 2 people makes this done within 5 minutes. The fact that dealerships charge so much for this is mind blowing.

While waiting on the caliper bracket, I got fog lights to install. I was told instructions would be provided, and weren't and I couldn't find detailed videos for my model. It was pretty self explanatory. The fact that I found out every Forester is already wired for fog lights, made it just to hard to pass up since I was already under the car anyway. The only thing I would let everyone know is the fog lights do not turn on unless the lights are on. This delayed me because I didn't think they were working and there was an electrical issue. The install was literally putting the bulb in from the back, putting in a push pin and tightening a bolt. Then attaching the wiring was easy. The kit from Subaru is either in black or gray, gray was almost twice the price so I opted for the black. The two colors are referenced to the interior color of the plastic. I don't have any specialized tools but I know I can find somebody with a dremel in order to cut out the switch cover on my original bracket. So I just installed the black piece for now.

All in all, everything really wasn't that difficult. I had one friend working with me and we could have gotten it all done in a day if the bolt on the caliper bracket did not break. If anyone has any questions or comments or suggestions or I see something I might have done wrong, please let me know. I hope this will be a learning experience for everyone. If you want more details on any of the things I've done, let me know. And if I could get an answer if I should get rid of some of that gear oil and the transmission, I'd really appreciate it. Thank you for taking the time to read this.
 

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2017 Forester 2.5i MT
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The oil change was done because my fumoto valve started leaking and I was losing to much oil.
Do you know what caused the fumoto to leak? From the threads? At the valve mechanism? During installation a wrench was put on the part of the valve body where is was not supposed to be?
 

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2015 Forester i Premium
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do you know what caused the fumoto to leak? From the threads? At the valve mechanism? During installation a wrench was put on the part of the valve body where is was not supposed to be?
I'm not really sure. The washer had never been replaced. I'm thinking it just finally soaked through
 

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2017 Forester 2.5i MT
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Don't know what kind of washer you have, but some have noted leaks from that "fiber" washer. I'm over two years with mine and no problems so far. Others have noted leaks if they did not replace the metal crush washer with a new one when they changed from the original plug to the fumoto.
 
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