('09-'13) Front Brake Rotor and Pad Replacement - Subaru Forester Owners Forum
User Tag List

 1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 01:48 PM Thread Starter
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: SE CT
Posts: 49
Car Year: 2009
Car Model: Forester X
Transmission: Auto
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Post Front Brake Rotor and Pad Replacement

After contemplating having a shop do my brakes and then doing some research online, especially on this forum, I decided to do it myself. It was actually way easier than I thought. I haven't seen too much on 2009 and up Forester brake jobs so I took some pics. BTW, I bought the vehicle new and have over 81,000 miles on it so the brakes lasted much longer than any other vehicle I have owned.

Car up on jackstands and the wheel off. Ready to get started.



First, I removed the 14 mm Caliper bolts. They were fairly easy to get off. The shiny wet area in the pic is where I sprayed PB Blaster on the caliper Support Bracket bolts.



The Caliper is now removed. I supported it out of the way with bungee cords.





Now for the tough part, removing the Caliper Support Bracket bolts (17 mm). I had read about these bolts having a tendency to break or snap off. I soaked them for a while with PB Blaster and then tried getting them out with a large 1/2" drive ratchet. Couldn't get either to budge. Then I grabbed my 25" breaker bar (1/2" drive) and then slowly put even pressure on the bolt and it finally gave way and started backing out. I thought this might be a better way to remove the bolt than hammering on the ratchet or breaker bar. I thought that would be too risky. It seemed to work as I got both bolts out without breaking anything. I also got both out on the other side too without breaking anything. The upper bolts were not as tough as the lower bolts.



Looking at one of the bottom Caliper Support Bracket bolts in the pic below, you can see where the corrosion and galled up threads are located. This is a pic after I tried to clean the bolt with brake cleaner and a wire brush. That is not dirt, it is corrosion. You can see the threads at the bottom are clean. These are the threads that screw into the outside of the caliper Support bracket. The part of the hub where the bolt goes through is smooth and not threaded so the bolt just passes through it (see the pic of the hub below). I believe this is where the bolt seizes up. The bolt corrodes inside the hub area and seizes up in that hole. I don't believe it seizes up in the threads as some people believe due to the threaded portion being clean. That would explain why the heads snap off instead of most bolts snapping off right where the bolt enters the threaded part of the Caliper Support bracket. I am sure others have their theories, this is just mine as to why the bolts are hard to get out.

The Caliper Support Bracket Bolt:



The hub showing the smooth non-threaded holes the Caliper Support Bracket bolts go through:



The Caliper Support Bracket showing the clean holes where the bolts thread into (shown with old pads still installed):



Ok, so once the Caliper Support Bracket is removed, the rotors came right off. I had two 8 mm bolts ready to thread into the rotor to force it off the hub, but both rotors came right off. Now that everything is apart, I cleaned the new rotor with brake cleaner and installed it (used a lug nut to keep it flush against the hub).



Then I put new hardware and the new brake pads in the Caliper Support bracket. I also removed the Caliper Guide Pins, cleaned them up, lubed them, and re-installed with new rubber boots.



The Caliper Support Bracket was then re-installed on the rotor/hub assembly. I did use anti-seize on the new bracket bolts and torqued them down accordingly. I also applied brake lube to the back of the pads.





Next, I removed the cover from the Master Cylinder and placed rags around the opening to catch any overflow (tt was close, but nothing overflowed). I used two 3" C-Clamps against an old brake pad to slowly press the caliper pistons back in. I slowly alternated tightening each one until both pistons were seated in the Caliper. The 3" C-Clamps barely fit, I had to fully loosen (expand them) to fit the Caliper prior to tightening. The 4" C-Clamps may be a better option, but the 3" size worked for me. I cleaned the faces of the Caliper pistons and lubed up the rubber part with brake lube prior to assembly onto the rotor.



The Caliper was then bolted back onto the Caliper Support Bracket.



Then I did the other side as shown below:

Wheel removed, ready to work this side



Caliper and Caliper Support Bracket removed showing the hub and brake shield



Caliper Support Bracket with old pads installed



Caliper Support Bracket with new hardware, pads, and rubber boots installed on the hub along with a new rotor assembly.





Caliper was re-installed and now ready to put the wheels back on. I did use a kitchen turkey baster to remove excess fluid from the Master Cylinder (bought one specifically for this purpose, not using the wife's). Note that I turned the car on and pumped the brakes a few times to check for leaks. Much easier than I thought and I have driven the car several times since and have no problems. Going to do the rear brakes next month.



Thanks to all who have posted on here about their brakes as it really helped me a whole lot.

Rob

Texaswheels likes this.

Last edited by CWO3; 08-18-2013 at 04:44 PM.
CWO3 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 02:30 PM
Super Moderator
Contributing Member
 
bbottomley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: New London, NH
Posts: 15,450
Car Year: 2003
Car Model: XS Premium
Transmission: MT
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
And thanks for adding to the knowledge base, Chief. I'm linking your post from our official DIY Forum for greater visibility.


Me: 2003XS Premium MT ● She: 2016i Premium CVT ● Robin-Subaru Powered Generator
bbottomley is offline  
post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 03:29 PM
Forum Member
 
Uling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Southern CA
Posts: 420
Car Year: 2011
Car Model: 2.5X Limited
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Nice work, thanks for making it clear it was an easy job.

I could not find OEM brake pads on some online stores, what pads and rotors did you go with?

Also, do these cars have a brake pad wear sensor indicating that the pads are due to be replaced soon? If not, how can you tell?
Uling is offline  
 
post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 04:39 PM Thread Starter
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: SE CT
Posts: 49
Car Year: 2009
Car Model: Forester X
Transmission: Auto
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uling View Post
Nice work, thanks for making it clear it was an easy job.

I could not find OEM brake pads on some online stores, what pads and rotors did you go with?

Also, do these cars have a brake pad wear sensor indicating that the pads are due to be replaced soon? If not, how can you tell?
I didn't go with the OEM parts. I went with the Duralast rotors and pads from Autozone. The rotors were $35 each and the Gold series pads were $35. They currently have a coupon on their website for $20 off when you buy 2 rotors and pads (select the rotors and on that page is the link to info on $20 off brake parts). So, for around $110 or so (with tax) I got the rotors, pads and hardware kit. They may not last as long as more expensive parts, but for my use, they are just fine and although I just installed them recently, I have been impressed with them so far. Not an endorsement for Duralast or Autozone, just saying I thought it was a good deal.

As far as the wear indicator, there is a clip on the inboard (inside) pad that I believe is a wear indicator that makes noise when the pad gets to a certain thickness (or thinness if you will). Best way to tell is just take a look next time your wheels are off (maybe your next tire rotation). Maybe somebody else can chime in with better info.

Rob
CWO3 is offline  
post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 04:51 PM
Forum Member
 
MN Kid's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 498
Car Year: 2010
Car Model: Forester Xt LTD
Transmission: Auto
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Maybe add the torque specs to it? I did mine a few weeks ago. Those are tough to track down a lot of the time. 59 lbs front, maybe 39 rear for support bolts? 8lbs for bleeding nipple..any others I suppose you used. My numbers need to be verified. But good write up.

2010 "Paprika" FXT, 4EA/T VF52
MN Kid is offline  
post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-18-2013, 06:28 PM
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 679
Car Year: 2010
Car Model: Forester Premium X
Transmission: AT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I think this is one of the better DIY forester brake threads out there. Finally someone who actually lubes up the slide pins (hopefully you used silicone based lube and not petroleum based that reacts with the boots) and discusses the PITA bracket bolts.

In my experience, however, the breaker bar method is more likely to snap those bolts than heat and a light impact setting.
Inspector is offline  
post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-18-2013, 02:57 PM
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Tucson
Posts: 10
Car Year: 2010
Car Model: Forester XT Premium
Transmission: Automatic
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Torque Specs according to 2010 FSM:

Front
Fill Nipple - 5.9 ft-lb
Caliper - 19.9 ft-lb
Caliper Support - 59 ft-lb

Rear
Fill Nipple - 5.9 ft-lb
Caliper - 19.9 ft-lb
Caliper Support - 48.7 ft-lb

Wheel
Lug Nuts - 73.8 ft-lb

Last edited by skrap853; 11-18-2013 at 07:59 PM. Reason: added wheel torque
skrap853 is offline  
post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-11-2014, 05:08 PM
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: ontario , ny
Posts: 56
Car Year: 2009
Car Model: Subaru Forester
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I have replaced brakes on various vehicles but havn't tried the Subaru Forester yet . Never had any major problem but ........ it made me nervous when the OP mentioned the possibility of breaking the Caliper Support Bracket Bolts .
Has anyone had this happen to them ?
fasteddie is offline  
post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 03-19-2014, 03:03 PM
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 43
Car Year: 2015
Car Model: forester
Transmission: AT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
noisy new brakes

I replaced front and rear pads, with new front rotors a few months ago. Bought non OEM rotors, better quality, and yellow pads. I cleaned everything, lubed everything and stops well. But, they vibrate and chatter when using brakes in town. I didn't change the hardware and am going to soon. That should stop the noise.
cook4cons is offline  
post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 03-19-2014, 05:47 PM
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Port Moody, BC
Posts: 12
Car Year: 2010
Car Model: Forester PZEV
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrap853 View Post
Torque Specs according to 2010 FSM:

Front
Fill Nipple - 5.9 ft-lb
Caliper - 19.9 ft-lb
Caliper Support - 59 ft-lb

Rear
Fill Nipple - 5.9 ft-lb
Caliper - 19.9 ft-lb
Caliper Support - 48.7 ft-lb

Wheel
Lug Nuts - 73.8 ft-lb
And for those of us of the metric persuasion:

Fill Nipple - 8 Nm
Caliper - 27 Nm
Caliper Support - 80 Nm
Lug Nuts - 100 Nm

Flashpoint is offline  
post #11 of 17 (permalink) Old 03-20-2014, 05:04 AM
Forum Member
 
trajik78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Queens, NY
Posts: 720
Car Year: 2009
Car Model: Forester XT
Transmission: Auto
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
nice. I bought Stop-tech cryo treated rotors and ceramic pads all around at about 70k. I also put on new steel brake lines (red coated) for a little bling and performance. Thing I liked about the Stoptech rotors is the black panted hub.

My brakes are more responsive...not touch them and stop on a dime fast, but a vast improvement over my old fading setup.

What parts did you buy?


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- VF52 Stage 2+
trajik78 is offline  
post #12 of 17 (permalink) Old 04-20-2014, 05:42 PM
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 50
Car Year: 2011
Car Model: Forester
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I replaced pads and rotors on all four wheels on my 2011 today. It was my first time ever doing brakes, and it went pretty smoothly after reading this thread and a few others. I was a little afraid of breaking the caliper support bracket bolts on the fronts after hearing about them breaking on a lot of other people, but all of them came loose in one piece without to much trouble. Since I had both ingredients on-hand (though my wife no longer has any nail polish remover ), I decided to try the homemade penetrating oil of half acetone/half ATF that the internet rumor mill claims is way better than PB blaster and other off-the-shelfs. I liberally soaked all of the bracket bolts on all wheels before starting and started with the rear wheels to give the stubborn front ones more time to soak. When I had to get up for something, I'd occasionally spray them again...probably out of paranoia. Anyways, it seems to have worked well, because a 17mm socket, an 18" 3/8 drive breaker bar, and moderate steady pressure broke each one loose intact. Like the pictures above, the nastiest, most corroded part of each bolt was the part near the head that passes through the smooth holes in the bracket. I cleaned them up and put a little anti-seize on just that part of each bolt. Since the anti-seize wasn't on the threads that were being used, I torqued them back to their published torque values.

Anyways, for a little more than half of what the shop wanted to just do my rear brakes, I did all four wheels on my Forester and the fronts on my wife's civic
KennyPowers is online now  
post #13 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-28-2014, 08:01 AM
Forum Member
 
Andyman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: CNY
Posts: 83
Car Year: 2015
Car Model: Forester 2.5iPremium
Transmission: CVT
Garage
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Nice write-up! Thanks for posting. Good to have some pictures of what I'll be getting into when my new Forester arrives.
I have a few questions, though... I'd definitely consider myself a DIY novice when it comes to car repairs, but I have maintained brakes on at least 3 different cars (all smallish Toyotas) for the past 6+ years. So I'm not sure if I was taught wrong, of if I'm spending unnecessary time where it isn't important, but there were a few things I noticed in the writeup and pictures.

First, it seems to me like the importance of anti-seize has been under-emphasized in this thread. The OP mentions it once, and then nobody until KennyPowers in the last post says anything about it, despite specific mentions of seized bolts. In my (very limited) experience, that makes all the difference with regular brake maintenance. I lightly goop up just about every bolt I remove from a car before re-inserting it, and I've always found it easy to remove again later. Especially caliper and support bolts, and it seems like a good coating early in the life of the car would basically eliminate problems with that break-prone support bolt. Kenny alludes to differing torque readings with lubed threads, and I'm aware of that phenomenon, but never had a problem with anything loosening, over the few hundred thousand miles I've been watching cars.

Second, in the picture of the compressed pistons it looks to me like the rubber boots around the pistons are bulged out a bit. How did you prevent this from getting pinched between the piston and the pad upon re-installation? Despite my best attempts I've had this happen a couple of times, and fortunately noticed and replaced the boot before there was any obvious damage to the piston. I would say flattening out bulges in that caliper boot can be one of the more difficult parts of replacing brake pads. Any tips or tricks?

Third, my personal preference is to dissemble, clean, and lube my brakes at least once a year, whether or not anything needs to be replaced. I don't remove/replace the dust covers on the slider pins unless they feel sticky or rough, but I remove the pads and get a good look at everything, spray/brush out any accumulated brake dust, and lube all the contact points with brake grease. I usually do this when switching off snow tires, since the car is jacked up with wheels off anyway. This prevents anything from getting seized up or rusting without my knowledge. An ounce of prevention, you know.

Thanks in advance for any replies to satisfy my curiosity, and I hope something here might be helpful,
Andy
Andyman is offline  
post #14 of 17 (permalink) Old 04-18-2015, 10:02 AM
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Quebec, Canada
Posts: 1
Car Year: 03
Car Model: Impreza WRX
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Thanks for the nice write up with nice pictures! I have a 2003 WRX on which I have been doing all brake jobs, but our 2012 Forester is now due for the front brakes, and thanks to your thread I now know it is pretty much the same as on my WRX.

And I did not knew about the bolts having a tendency to break, so that is very nice to know, especially with you theory on the source of the problem, I think it makes perfect sense and I will make sure to clean up and anti-seize this area of the bolts.

Fred
Frederik is offline  
post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-27-2016, 05:47 PM
RLN
Forum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Grand Rapids, MI
Posts: 1
Car Year: 2009
Car Model: Forester
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Thank you!

This was the second brake job I've done (the first on my 1996 Ford Explorer). This was great to get an idea of what I had to look out for.

I just got my forester for a decent price but higher mileage, and decided to do the brakes myself. Bought slotted rotors/ceramic pads from 1a auto for $150 (free shipping), although the caliper bolts busted on both the front and back on the driver's side. I was close to Autozone, so other than the extra cost, it wasn't much of an inconvenience. Took me a little longer than I'd like to admit, but for my second brake job and changing all 4 in one go, it went pretty well. The front rotors were a bit of a pain to get off, but placing a crowbar in the right spot (didn't have 8mm bolts) did the job.

Does anyone recommend a brake fluid flush or can anyone direct me to more information on frequency/necessity?
RLN is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Subaru Forester Owners Forum > Technical Forums and Vehicle Assistance > Brakes

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 

Title goes here

close
video goes here
description goes here. Read Full Story
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1